African gods and slavery-Slavery and religion - Wikipedia

About this site Feedback Site map. One way the enslaved Africans had of resisting their enslavement was to keep alive their African culture. In personal names, customs, music, stories, food and beliefs, the slaves could preserve their identity as Africans and be disrespectful to their European owners. African religious beliefs were kept alive in the Caribbean and the Americas. Sometimes, African beliefs were merged with Christian belief.

African gods and slavery

He is said to have used these slave chains in his speeches, showing the conditions under which slaves lived and worked. In the first decade of ownership, slvaery hundred slaves at the plantation estates were branded on their chests, using the traditional red hot iron, with the word Societyto signify their ownership by the Christian organisation. No slumber can seize Him, nor sleep. The Africans enslaved in the Americas were not all of one background; rather, they spoke different languages, and their myths, magic, gods and beliefs Pregnancy or menopause due to hormonal often not the same. Main article: Mormonism and slavery. A series of bulls and encyclicals inand from several popes condemned both slavery and the slave African gods and slavery.

Japanese lesbian movies yuri. History Shows that Christianity Had Its Roots in Africa

We are finding our real roots in Jesus, who has made us his own special people. Women are told they must wear the Arabic African gods and slavery. Numerically at least, Christianity is no longer just the white man's religion. The first Mamluks served the Abbasid caliphs in 9th century Baghdad. His conclusion, however, disturbed me. The majority were sailors particularly those who were Englishtaken with their ships, but others were fishermen and coastal villagers. London: Cambridge University Press. This declaration—a fulfillment of Isaiah Nude guinivere his role as a holistic liberator. The Islamic Arfican has been growing in Africa, but so has Christianity. Was Slavery God's Will? Historian Walter Rodney identified no slavery or significant domestic servitude in early European accounts on the Upper Guinea region [6] and I.

Christian views on slavery are varied regionally, historically and spiritually.

  • They also say Christianity is the White man's religion, which took away the African's true Muslim identity through the forced imposition of the slave master's name and religion.
  • At the Promise Keepers pastors conference in Atlanta, a Native American brother stood up and chronicled the many gross sins committed by white Americans against Native Americans over the centuries.
  • The continent of Africa is one of the regions most rife with contemporary slavery.
  • Slavery has historically been widespread in Africa, and still continues today in some countries.

Devotion to Jesus has been a large part of the African-American experience. Should we, as black people, follow this Jesus? The best historical record of Jesus' life is found in the Bible. Black people appear on the stage of biblical history many times. Several works have been done to chronicle these instances.

This means that Zipporah's father, Jethro, was also black. Niger simply means "black. To say that the Bible is the white man's holy book or to suggest that it is European in origin or nature, is simply not taking into account the facts. Some ask, "Isn't Christianity a late arrival in Africa? Isn't it a foreign religion to Africa and Africans? John Mbiti outlines the fact that the message of Jesus spread throughout Africa before it ever reached Europe. The conversion of the Ethiopian eunuch described in the Book of Acts predates the apostle Paul's first missionary journey into Europe by a number of years.

There is clear, historical documentation of the church in Africa by the third century. Christianity was the dominant religion in North Africa and most notably Egypt. Egyptian and North African scholars such as Clement, Origen, Tertullian, and Athanasius are widely recognized as fathers of the church. By the year , Egypt had more than a million Christians. The Christian Nubian Kingdoms survived for years, resisting attempted domination by Muslim conquerors for of those years.

Though persecuted, their presence is testimony to the historicity of Christianity in Africa. First of all, slave trading was not introduced to Sub-Saharan Africa from Europe. Arab Muslims had been conducting a slave trade for hundreds of years before Europeans arrived on the west coast of Africa. Second, the slave traders themselves seldom claimed to be devout men, even though they came from "Christian nations.

Look at the life of a white Englishman named William Wilberforce. He led the fight against the slave trade in Parliament because of his commitment to Jesus Christ. His is an incredible story of sacrifice and dedication to truth and justice for African people.

While it took his entire life to win this victory, win he did. In the United States, however, Christians reacted to slavery in a substantially different way than the Europeans.

While there was vocal Christian protest against the slave trade and much of the abolitionist movement was spear-headed by Christian people, there were also many Christians who defended slavery. The issue of slavery grew more divisive, and eventually most of the major Protestant denominations divided over the issue. This actually set the stage for the Civil War. While many factors contributed to the onset of the Civil War, slavery was a principle cause for the split of the nation, South from North.

Many rightly contend that Abraham Lincoln's original objective in the war was not the removal of slavery from the South.

Yet it is clear that as the war dragged on, he began to sense the larger drama. In his Second Inaugural Address, Lincoln spoke eloquently of his growing belief that God was judging the United States for indulging the wicked institution of slavery. Our nation lost more lives in that one conflict than in all its other wars combined. Perhaps we can conclude that God did not turn a blind eye to the sufferings of the slaves, nor did He wink at the conduct of those who oppressed African people in America.

What was the attitude of the slaves through all of this? How could our forefathers embrace the religion of their oppressors? Missionary efforts among the slaves were allowed because owners assumed that Christianity would make slaves better workers. The slaves discovered this contradiction but did not allow that to interfere with receiving the transcendent truth of the Bible. In its pages they found hope, courage, strength and comfort. Their spirituals are the legacy of the faith of those who, from an earthly standpoint, had cause for despair.

The slaves who turned to Jesus knew the difference between some of the versions of Christianity they were seeing practiced and the Christianity they were hearing described in the Bible. Hence the line in the spiritual, "Everybody talkin' 'bout heaven ain't goin' there.

Jesus provided the hope and power they needed to survive slavery. This faith enabled our forefathers to endure trials and hardships that we can only imagine. This faith inspired leaders to respond courageously to the problems of our people. These leaders were the likes of Harriet Tubman, Frederick Douglass, Sojourner Truth, and the thousands of former slaves who enlisted in the Union Army to fight for their freedom.

The Bible taught them that they were children of the Most High God, citizens of His heavenly kingdom, and that they had inherent value as humans. When they entered into prayer and worship, they experienced a fleeting but galvanizing foretaste of an eventual eternal reward. The North's victory in the Civil War did not end our problems. Black Americans again found themselves being systematically and legally oppressed.

Unfortunately, once again, many who claimed to be Christians were involved in the reign of terror, which sought to keep African Americans in their place.

The Southern white church was at best silent, and at worse, actively defending the conduct of those who were marauding among, intimidating, and lynching our people.

Black societies and businesses were seldom allowed to survive. The black community found refuge in the church. The vibrancy and progressive power of the black church is well documented. It was in the churches that the black colleges were conceived, given birth and prayed for. It was the clergy who often provided the leadership for the black community at large. And it was the church that gave us our drum major for justice, the Rev. Martin Luther King, Jr.

Faith in Jesus Christ has not created passivity but rather activism in thousands of African Americans. It is true that there have been those who have attempted to justify their mistreatment of us on the basis of the Bible.

But this view has never held up to honest scrutiny. Those who have followed Jesus Christ have been some of our most effective leaders, our most impressive achievers, and our most eloquent spokespeople. By their own testimony, these African-American Christians declare that it was their relationship with Jesus that fueled their struggle, energized their activism, and gave them hope for a better future for our people.

Those early mass meetings were characterized by prayer, the singing of hymns and spirituals, and an orderliness of conduct that revealed the Christian influence of the attendees.

King's appeal was to the moral conscience of the nation, based on its Judeo-Christian values. Yet, the white church failed to support his pleas for justice, freedom and equal treatment. It took the emerging electronic media's coverage of atrocities in the South to finally shame a reluctant federal government to get involved. It was the government, not the white church, that secured the rights for which so many had prayed, marched and shed blood.

No longer do we look to God as the one to whom we are accountable. We are our own authority. Some even teach that "The black man is God. If this is so, then we can define our own morality, establish our own standards of behavior, and sit in judgment of everyone else. But we have failed because we are not God. No wonder drug trade is seen as an understandable and too often an acceptable career choice. No wonder teenage pregnancy continues to rise and sexually transmitted diseases are approaching epidemic proportions.

It almost seems that African-American culture is being overrun by a pathological pursuit of self-aggrandizement, sensuality and prosperity at any cost. The poet and educator James Weldon Johnson proved to be prophetic when he wrote the last stanza of "Lift Every Voice and Sing" in This work came to be known as the Negro National Anthem and was sung daily after the Pledge of Allegiance in many black schools up until the time of desegregation.

His lyrics warned us of the potential for our current predicament:. God of our weary years, God of our silent tears, Thou who hast led us thus far on our way, Thou who hast by thy might led us into the light keep us forever in the path we pray.

Lest our feet stray from the places, our God, where we met Thee. Lest our hearts, drunk with the wine of the world, we forget Thee. What should we do now? How can we honor our history, respond to the present, and build a viable, vibrant future for our people?

It is not too late. In any case, it starts with an individual choice. You must choose Jesus for yourself. Choosing Jesus prepares you to be a real agent of change in our community. A vibrant relationship with Christ will give you the power to govern yourself and live according to what is right, not according to what is expedient. Those of us who discover the power of a relationship with Christ and who see the need for spiritual transformation in our community must band together to build a new future.

We must tell the truth about the challenges we face and develop an agenda for overcoming those challenges. That agenda emanates from Jesus. In the Book of Proverbs in the Bible it says, "Righteousness exalts a nation We have been looked down on so long and so pervasively, and our people disappoint us so often, we can begin to wonder if the negative stereotypes are really true. In this vulnerable state we are susceptible to the persuasiveness of eloquent orators who will tell us that we are the best, brightest, most noble people on the earth.

It is easy to buy into ideas that lift black people above all others. Our righteous anger is easily manipulated to get us to buy into theories of a white conspiracy to hold us back.

Retrieved 24 November Historian Walter Rodney identified no slavery or significant domestic servitude in early European accounts on the Upper Guinea region [6] and I. Slave labor is performed by the debtor , or a relative of the debtor usually a child. Cambridge University Press. The story of Biram Dah Abeid , a prominent anti-slavery activist on trial, illustrates the troubled history and continued prevalence of slavery in Mauritania. Issue 56 looks at the great challenge that faced Christian missionaries like David Livingstone when they tried to eradicate African slavery.

African gods and slavery

African gods and slavery. More from this Issue

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African-American history and Jesus -- Is Jesus relevant for the black community?

About this site Feedback Site map. One way the enslaved Africans had of resisting their enslavement was to keep alive their African culture. In personal names, customs, music, stories, food and beliefs, the slaves could preserve their identity as Africans and be disrespectful to their European owners.

African religious beliefs were kept alive in the Caribbean and the Americas. Sometimes, African beliefs were merged with Christian belief. The best-known example of this mixing of religions is the vodou religion found on the Caribbean island of Haiti.

Here, African beliefs were mixed with the teachings of the Catholic Church. The Africans shipped across the Atlantic Ocean to the Americas were taken away from their traditional culture and sold into a new culture. They were able to keep parts of their traditional culture alive, and adapt it to their new circumstances. The enslaved Africans of different ethnic groups and cultural traditions could work together to create new ceremonies, a mix of all their beliefs, for burying the dead, naming children and other important occassions.

The dead were often buried with food and drink, which was thought to sustain them on their journey into the afterlife. They were probably also buried with other objects which would identify the dead person to their relatives in the afterlife. It was believed that the dead person would return to Africa, as long as their body was intact. The European plantation owners could use this against the enslaved Africans. As a threat, punishments could involve mutilation of the body, cutting off the toes of persistent runaways, for example.

This was feared by the slaves as they thought it would prevent their spirit from returning to Africa after death. As in so many parts of Africa, the ancestors were deeply respected. On the island of Antigua in the Caribbean on Christmas Day, because that was given as a day off, the slaves would visit the graveyards and make offerings of food and drink at the graves of their relatives. Amongst the African men and women sold into slavery there were those who had specialist knowledge of all things sacred.

These were priests of various gods, and herbalists people who knew about herbs and their properties. These people were held in great esteem by the slaves on the plantations. Europeans usually referred to all of them under the one term Obeah , which they confused with witchcraft.

The Obeah men and women grew from the overlapping of jobs, such as herbalist, diviners, witch doctors, and mediums. They diagnosed and treated illness, obtained revenge for injury, cured the bewitched, found out and punished theft and adultery and predicted the future. They were feared by the white plantation owners, for their power over the slaves, their association with slave rebellions and their knowledge of poisons.

On British colonies, the attitude to Christianity was mixed. Many slaves believed that being baptised as a Christian would make them free. They thought this because a Christian could not be a slave. For this reason plantation owners often discouraged Christian preaching, as it gave their slaves ideas above their status.

But Christian missionaries did work on the Caribbean islands, preaching and converting slaves. Some white people disliked the missionaries for other reasons. One Samuel Augustus Mathews of the island of St Eustatius seems to have disapproved of the Methodist Church and the effect that their preaching had on the slaves. The churches did work on the Caribbean islands, sometimes with the permission of the plantation owners, sometimes without.

On the British islands it was mainly the evangelical churches which sent missionaries out to the slaves. The Baptist and Methodist churches had many converts amongst the slaves. Religion could provide a way for the slaves to organise and educate themselves.

It gave black leaders a training in organisation. It gave the slaves a hope of something better after death. Church leaders and missionaries were not always popular with the supposedly Christian plantation owners. He went out to the island of Jamaica in The slave trade had been abolished but slavery itself continued on the plantations. He saw the cruelties of the system. Knibb became a champion of the slaves, fighting their cause. The preachings of the Baptist Church about freedom were blamed for a major slave uprising in Jamaica, called the Baptist War, in Rumours of impending freedom for the slaves encouraged the rebellion.

The Baptist War was brutally put down by the British authorities in Jamaica. Over rebels were executed. Knibb himself returned to Britain to campaign for the end of slavery. He was an inspiring speaker and travelled the country preaching against slavery.

He is said to have used these slave chains in his speeches, showing the conditions under which slaves lived and worked.

African gods and slavery

African gods and slavery