Asian inspired toilet bowls-10 Things You Need to Know About Japanese Toilets | MATCHA - JAPAN TRAVEL WEB MAGAZINE

By One Kindesign July 24, Filed Under: Inspiration. These spaces typically showcase traditional Japanese influenced architecture, design and art. A traditional Asian style bathroom incorporates plenty of natural materials into the design. Specifically, wood and stone are utilized interchangeably for surfaces such as flooring, and sink tops and can draw the outside in through the use of untreated wood and rough-hewn or matte stone.

Asian inspired toilet bowls

Asian inspired toilet bowls

Asian inspired toilet bowls

Many businesses mitigate the Asian inspired toilet bowls of messy blockages by not providing any paper at Myspace pics cheese nips All in all, your space should reflect a clean lined aesthetic with minimalist decor, a soothing color scheme and natural materials. But don't fear! If you find yourself in a no-name village in the hills, be prepared to venture into a brick Asian inspired toilet bowls with no electricity and little more than a large hole in the ground. This is due to the ethic in separating clean from unclean, and this fact is a selling point in properties for rent. China Supplier Custom logo hot sell squatting wc pan one piece toilet lowest price asian style.

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Using squat toilets in China may not be on a traveler's "top 10 list" for their vacation, but it usually becomes a part of their Chinese experience.

  • When everything is mingling together in one bowl, it means your meal is a one-stop-shop.
  • Cooking with Asian ingredients is not only good for the waistline but it makes for healthy eating much more interesting!
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Using squat toilets in China may not be on a traveler's "top 10 list" for their vacation, but it usually becomes a part of their Chinese experience. Public restrooms are getting more and more sanitary in China, but some are still shocking. China is one of the most popular vacation destinations in the world, and this is with good reason. Tourism and toilets are well-developed at sights like the Forbidden City, and starred hotels are usually of a high standard, despite China being a developing country.

However, one thing that many people find surprising when they first get to China is the squat toilet. Squat toilets are not seen in most of the Western world, but in China, it's more likely than not that a person will walk into a restroom and find a toilet that is level or, pardon the pun, "flush" with the floor. These toilets require a bit of getting used to. Squat toilets aren't excessively difficult to use. The majority of a person's problems come from not being well-versed on how to use the toilets.

Not knowing how to use these toilets can mean waiting in much longer lines for Western toilets, so a little foreknowledge is best. The cleanliness of squat toilets is very much dependent on where you are in China. If you are in a high-end mall in the middle of Shanghai, or an airport, you can expect the toilets to be frequently checked by staff and regularly mopped although it's unclear how often the mop gets cleaned. If you find yourself in a no-name village in the hills, be prepared to venture into a brick shack with no electricity and little more than a large hole in the ground.

They may not be pretty, but they're certainly memorable! In general, the cleanliness level is improving as China develops, and you will usually find yourself in a public toilet that is very much comparable to most Western public restrooms as in, you still wouldn't want to spend too long in there. There'll usually be stalls, a cleaning lady at the ready who has no qualms about pushing a mop around as you're doing your business and, if you're going to the men's restroom, a few gentlemen standing around having a quick cigarette before going back to work.

However, if nature calls when you're taking a slow train be prepared for one of the foulest moments in your life. In each carriage there are two squat toilets squat toilets only I'm afraid , which, after an hour or two of travel time, become places you really don't want to be.

Due to the motion of the train aiming becomes difficult, and you will need to grip on to something as falling over on that floor is not something anyone should have to experience. If you can, opt for travelling by a high-speed bullet train. The toilets on these are vastly nicer, well-serviced, and may even include a Western-style toilet. Warning: Be prepared for the fact that some of the more low-end public bathrooms don't offer much in the way of privacy.

Toilets with stall walls built only a meter off the ground with no doors are thankfully being replaced with taller cubicles with doors, but the locks if still attached may not work, so holding the door shut or making a noise may be required to stop others pushing the door open.

Visitors to China will likely have to use a squat toilet at some point, but going before leaving the hotel will reduce the number of interruptions to a person's vacation. Many people also plan pit stops at shopping malls, fancy restaurants, and international hotels, since these places usually have Western toilets.

Many public restrooms do not actually provide toilet tissue , so it's usually a great idea to pack a bit before heading out for the day. If you find yourself needing to go but don't have any toilet paper you really have only two options. There's also a strong chance that a restroom will have no soap or paper towels or blow drier to dry one's hands with.

You will also find that many public restrooms, even in big cities like Beijing, won't have heated water. You may need a small amount of change since many public restrooms have started to charge a fee. The first thing that a person should do before going into a bathroom is have a friend or family member hold their bags e.

This isn't so they won't get stolen, but rather, because there are usually no hooks to hang these bags on and both hands will be needed for balance. After not forgetting to remove the toilet tissue from your bag, you may have to get in line for a toilet. Many restrooms have both Western and squat toilets, and some even have signs signifying which toilet a stall contains. It's not customary to simply hang back and wait for a stall to open, so choose one stall's line and stick with it.

Squat toilets aren't terribly difficult once a person knows how to use them. Unfortunately for many people vacationing in China, it will be their first time ever using one. The first thing to remember is that, even for men, the position to use these toilets is facing forward to avoid splashing over the waste pipe.

It's now necessary to stand with feet on either side of the squat toilet. There are grooves on each side of these toilets to help a person keep their feet in place while using it. An individual's feet should be towards the middle of these grooves and flat. After all of the aforementioned preparation is done, a person can let their pants down to half way down the thighs and squat over the toilet. It's important not to allow clothing to touch the floor ; this is true even if the place seems clean and spotless.

Once you have finished your business, you might notice a sign asking you not to flush your toilet paper, and a bin next to you filled with used tissue. Nowadays most toilets can actually handle flushing a moderate amount of toilet paper, and these notices mainly exist to discourage throwing all kinds of rubbish into the toilets as is done in rural toilets.

So the decision is yours whether you want to use the bin or try flushing the toilet paper. Be careful when it's time to stand back up , as the average Westerner is not used to spending even a short period of time in the squatted position.

So blood rushing back to your legs and difficulty balancing is a real issue if you haven't had practice. AU: UK: All: What is a squat toilet? See photo. A squat toilet in China. Toilets on Chinese trains don't stay this clean for long. The Top 12 China Holiday Wreckers. The Most Popular Articles.

The Great Wall of China. How to Plan a First Trip to China. Best Time to Visit China. Search useful travel articles by your interests and style.

Notify me via e-mail if anyone answers my comment. This is a beautiful round-up. I love healthy asian food. You can prepare everything ahead of time and then add the dressing right before eating. Packed with classic Asian flavors like ginger, hoisin and sesame, you won't notice the missing fat and calories. Healthy Asian Chicken Chopped Salad. This basic bowl has tuna, cherry tomatoes and cucumber with a simple lemon vinaigrette to finish.

Asian inspired toilet bowls

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How to Use a Squat Toilet in China: Chinese Toilet Tips

Some toilets in Japan are more elaborate than toilets commonly found in other developed nations. The feature set commonly found on washlets are anal hygiene , bidet washing, seat warming, and deodorization. Japanese toilets are well known in popular culture and often parodied in comedic works set in Japan. In many children's games, a child who is tagged "out" is sent to a special place, such as the middle of a circle, called the benjo.

There are two styles of toilets commonly found in Japan ; [6] [7] the oldest type is a simple squat toilet , which is still common in public conveniences. A squat toilet differs from a Western toilet in both construction and method of employment. A squat toilet essentially looks like a miniature urinal set horizontally into the floor.

Most squat toilets in Japan are made of porcelain, although in some cases as on trains stainless steel is used instead. The user squats over the toilet, facing the hemispherical hood, i. All other fixtures, such as the water tank, piping, and flushing mechanism, may be identical to those of a Western toilet. Flushing causes water to push the waste matter from the trough into a collecting reservoir which is then emptied, with the waste carried off into the sewer system.

The flush is often operated in the same manner as a Western toilet, though some have pull handles or pedals instead. The difference is in the amount of water used. The former is for urine in Japanese, literally "small excretion" and the latter for feces "large excretion". The lever is often pushed to the "small" setting to provide a continuous covering noise for privacy, as discussed below. Adapters that sit on top of the Japanese toilet to convert it to a functional sit-down toilet are much more common.

There are also permanently installed extensions available to convert a squat toilet into a Western-style washlet. There is a trend in Japan since the s to replace squat toilets at schools and public places with sitting toilets. Western-style toilets, including high tech toilets, are now more common in Japanese homes than the traditional squat toilets, [7] though some older apartments retain stickers on the toilet or in its room illustrating the proper way to use it for urination and defecation.

Many public toilets at schools, temples, and train stations are still equipped with only squat toilets. However, as the model was introduced in , it is now likely to be inferior to the latest model by Toto, Neorest. The age of the high-tech toilet in Japan started in [13] with the introduction of the Washlet G Series by Toto, and since then the product name washlet has been used to refer to all types of Japanese high-tech toilets.

As of , almost half of all private homes in Japan have such a toilet, exceeding the number of households with a personal computer.

The most basic feature is the integrated bidet, a nozzle the size of a pencil that comes out from underneath the toilet seat and squirts water. It has two settings: one for washing the anus and one for the bidet. At no point does the nozzle actually touch the body of the user. The nozzle is also self-cleaning and cleans itself before and after operation.

The user can select to wash the anus or vulva by pressing the corresponding button on the control panel. Usually the same nozzle is used for both operations, but at a different position of the nozzle head, and using different openings in the nozzle to squirt water at a different angle to aim for the correct spot. Occasionally, two nozzles are used, each dedicated for one area.

The control logic is also attached to a pressure switch or a proximity sensor in the toilet seat, and operates only when the seat is occupied. The very first models did not include this automatic switch-off. The seat-heating feature is very common, found even on toilets that lack the bidet features. As most Japanese homes lack central heating — instead using space heating — the bathroom may be only a few degrees above freezing in the winter.

Most high-tech toilets allow water temperature and water pressure to be adjusted to match the preferences of the user. By default, the vulva receives less pressure than the anus.

The nozzle position can also often be manually adjusted forward or aft. The washlet can replace toilet paper completely, but many users opt to use both wash and paper in combination—although use of paper may be omitted for cleaning of the vulva. Other features are automatic flushing, automatic air deodorizing , and a germ-resistant surface. A soft close feature slows the toilet lid down while closing so the lid does not slam onto the seat, or in some models, the toilet lid will close automatically a certain time after flushing.

The most recent introduction is the ozone deodorant system that can quickly eliminate smells. Also, the latest models store the times when the toilet is used and have a power-saving mode that warms the toilet seat only during times when the toilet is likely to be used based on historic usage patterns. Some toilets also glow in the dark or may even have air conditioning below the rim for hot summer days.

Another recent innovation is intelligent sensors that detect someone standing in front of the toilet and initiate an automatic raising of the lid if the person is facing away from the toilet or the lid and seat together if someone is facing the toilet.

Text explaining the controls of these toilets tends to be in Japanese only. Although many of the buttons often have pictograms, the flush button is often written only in Kanji , meaning that non-Japanese users may initially find it difficult to locate the correct button. Recently, researchers have added medical sensors into these toilets, which can measure the blood sugar based on the urine , and also measure the pulse, blood pressure, and the body fat content of the user.

The data may automatically be sent to a doctor through a built-in internet -capable cellular telephone. A voice-operated toilet that understands verbal commands is under development.

The repetitive use of a "type water jet on a high-pressure setting for an enema , can weaken the capability for self-evacuation of the Washlet user, which can lead to more serious constipation. Urinals in Japan are very similar to the urinals in the rest of the world, and mainly used for public male toilets or male toilets with a large number of users. They often are, however, mounted lower compared to urinals in the West. Female urinals never caught on in Japan, although there were attempts made to popularize the American Sanistand female urinal by the Japanese toilet manufacturing company Toto between and This device was shaped like a cone and placed on the floor.

However, those were never very popular, and only a few of them remain, including those underneath the now demolished National Olympic Stadium from the Summer Olympics in Tokyo , which was added to accommodate people from a wide range of cultures. Toilets in Japan have very similar accessories as most toilets worldwide, including toilet paper, a toilet brush , a sink, etc.

However, there are some Japan-specific accessories that are rarely found outside Japan. Many Japanese women are embarrassed at the thought of being heard by others during urination [26] see paruresis. To cover the sound of bodily functions, many women used to flush public toilets continuously while using them, wasting a large amount of water in the process. This device is now routinely placed in most new public women's rooms, and many older public women's rooms have been upgraded. The device is activated by pressing a button, or by the wave of a hand in front of a motion sensor.

When activated, the device creates a loud flushing sound similar to a toilet being flushed. This sound either stops after a preset time or can be halted through a second press on the button.

It is estimated that this saves up to 20 litres 4. In Japanese culture, there is a tendency to separate areas into clean and unclean , and the contact between these areas is minimized. For example, the inside of the house is considered a clean area, whereas the outside of the house is considered unclean.

To keep the two areas separated, shoes are taken off before entering the house so that the unclean shoes do not touch the clean area inside of the house. Historically, toilets were located outside of the house, and shoes were worn for a trip to the toilet.

Nowadays, the toilet is almost always inside the home and hygienic conditions have improved significantly, but the toilet is still considered an unclean area. They can be as simple as a pair of rubber slippers, decorated slippers with prints of anime characters for small children, or even animal fur slippers.

A frequent faux pas of foreigners is to forget to take off the toilet slippers after a visit to the restroom, and then use these in the non-toilet areas, hence mixing the clean and unclean areas. Public toilets are usually readily available all over Japan, and can be found in department stores, supermarkets, book stores, CD shops, parks, most convenience stores, and in all but the most rural train stations. Some older public toilet buildings lack doors, meaning that men using the urinals are in full view of people walking past.

Beginning in the s, there has been a movement to make public toilets cleaner and more hospitable than they had been in the past. The number of public restrooms that have both Western and squat types of toilets is increasing.

In addition, parks, temples, traditional Japanese restaurants, and older buildings typically only have squat toilets. Handicapped bathrooms are always Western style. Many public toilets do not have soap for washing hands, [31] or towels for drying hands. Many people carry a handkerchief with them for such occasions, [7] and some even carry soap. Some public toilets are fitted with powerful hand dryers to reduce the volume of waste generated from paper towels.

Hand dryers and taps are sometimes installed with motion-sensors as an additional resource-saving measure. In Japan, cleanliness is very important, and some Japanese words for 'clean' can be used to describe beauty. There is also a large market for deodorants and air fresheners that add a pleasant scent to the area. In the often crowded living conditions of Japanese cities and with the lack of rooms that can be locked from inside in a traditional Japanese house, the toilet is one of the few rooms in the house that allows for privacy.

Some toilet rooms are equipped with a bookshelf, in others people may enter with a newspaper, and some are even filled with character goods and posters. Even so, these toilets are, whenever possible, in rooms separate from those for bathing. This is due to the ethic in separating clean from unclean, and this fact is a selling point in properties for rent. Both the traditional squat toilet and the high-tech toilet are a source of confusion for foreigners unaccustomed to these devices.

There are humorous reports of individuals using a toilet, and randomly pressing buttons on the control panel either out of curiosity or in search for the flushing control, and suddenly to their horror receiving a jet of water directed at the genitals or anus.

As the water jet continues for a few seconds after he jumps up, he also gets himself or the bathroom wet. Many also have the buttons written in English to reduce the culture shock. In January , the Japan Sanitary Equipment Industry Association agreed to standardize the iconography used on the control panels for Japanese toilets, in an attempt to reduce confusion of foreign visitors to the country.

The environmental impact of modern style washlets differs from regular flush toilets. Modern toilets use less water than old toilets, and the self-cleaning options also reduce the amount of detergent. Toto Ltd. In the US for example, sales are well below Japanese levels, even though sales improved from units per month in to 1, units per month in In Europe , Toto sells only 5, washlets annually. This is mainly for the special purpose of toilets for the handicapped. Depending on the type of disability, handicapped persons may have difficulties reaching the anus region in order to clean themselves after toilet use.

Asian inspired toilet bowls

Asian inspired toilet bowls