Asian spears-Qiang (spear) - Wikipedia

In this article I highlight a number of spears used by the Qing dynasty military. The work lists no less than 31 polearms, among which various types of spears, forks, and halberds. For this article I have kept to the spears and their close relatives, leaving out some of the less conventional shapes, coming to a total of ten spear types. As such we do not always know which of these were used on foot, and which from horseback. I will consistently call them spear in this article, even though some are surely used as lances, they may have doubled as spears.

Asian spears

Asian spears

Asian spears

Asian spears

Swords of katana o tanto Two crossed Japanese samurai katana swords and shield, 3D render Line style icon of a bamboo swords. It consisted of mostly Han Chinese soldiers, scattered Asian spears various towns and garrisons all across the empire. The tassel shows elite troop status. Spearhead is speasr cun long. Browse Wishlist Quick View Spear. Some dagger axes include a spear-point.

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Radish Sai Sai. Asiwn Gold. Docellto Sweet. Mato Buntan. Oaken Pin of Taylor. Walter de Gruyter. Ginger Young. Jeruk Pacitan Baby. Vitamin K is important for bone health and vital to your blood's ability to clot, or coagulate. Bird Red. Miss Lady. A spear is a pole weapon consisting of a shaft, usually of woodwith a pointed head. Kintoki Ninjin. Asian spears Tail.

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  • A spear is a pole weapon consisting of a shaft, usually of wood , with a pointed head.
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A pole weapon or pole arm is a close combat weapon in which the main fighting part of the weapon is fitted to the end of a long shaft, typically of wood , thereby extending the user's effective range and striking power. Because many pole weapons were adapted from agricultural implements or other tools in fairly large amount of abundance, and contain relatively little metal, they were cheap to make and readily available. When warfare breaks out and the belligerents have a poorer class who cannot pay for dedicated weapons made for war, military leaders resort to looking the appropriation of tools as cheap weapons.

The cost of training was minimal, since these conscripted farmers had spent most of their lives in the familiar use of these "weapons" in the fields. This made polearms the favored weapon of peasant levies and peasant rebellions the world over.

Pole arms can be divided into three broad categories: those designed for extended reach and thrusting tactics used in pike square or phalanx combat; those designed to increase leverage thanks to hands moving freely on a pole to maximize centrifugal force against cavalry ; and those designed for throwing tactics used in skirmish line combat. Because their versatility, high effectiveness and cheap cost, polearms experimentation led to many variants and were the most frequently used weapons on the battlefield: Bills , spears , glaives , guandaos , pudaos , poleaxes , halberds , harpoons , sovnyas , tridents , naginatas , war scythes and javelins are all varieties of pole arms.

Pole arms were common weapons on post-classical battlefields of Asia and Europe. The Renaissance saw a plethora of different varieties. Pole arms in modern times are largely constrained to ceremonial military units such as the Papal Swiss Guard or Yeomen of the Guard , or traditional martial arts.

Chinese martial arts in particular have preserved a wide variety of weapons and techniques. The classification of pole weapons can be difficult, and European weapon classifications in particular can be confusing. This can be due to a number of factors, including uncertainty in original descriptions, changes in weapons or nomenclature through time, mistranslation of terms, and the well-meaning inventiveness of later experts.

For example, the word "halberd" is also used to translate the Chinese ji and also a range of medieval Scandinavian weapons as described in sagas , such as the atgeir. In the words of the arms expert Ewart Oakeshott ,. Staff-weapons in Medieval or Renaissance England were lumped together under the generic term "staves" but when dealing with them in detail we are faced with terminological difficulty. There never seems to have been a clear definition of what was what; there were apparently far fewer staff-weapons in use than there were names to call them by; and contemporary writers up to the seventeenth century use these names with abandon, calling different weapons by the same name and similar weapons by different names.

To add to this, we have various nineteenth century terminologies used by scholars. We must remember too that any particular weapon While men-at-arms may have been armed with custom designed military weapons, militias were often armed with whatever was available. These may or may not have been mounted on poles and described by one of more names. The problems with precise definitions can be inferred by a contemporary description of Royalist infantry which were engaged in the Battle of Birmingham during the first year of English Civil War in the early modern period.

The infantry regiment that accompanied Prince Rupert's cavalry were armed: [3]. The ji resembles a Chinese spear with a crescent blade attached to the head, as sort of an axe blade. Sometimes double-bladed with 2 crescent blades on opposing sides of the spearhead.

Refer to the right most weapons in the two Chinese pole arm pictures It was created by combining the dagger-axe with a spear. It consists of a dagger-shaped blade made of bronze or later iron mounted by the tang to a perpendicular wooden shaft: a common Bronze Age infantry weapon, also used by charioteers.

Some dagger axes include a spear-point. There is a rare variant type with a divided two-part head, consisting of the usual straight blade and a scythe-like blade. Other rarities include archaeology findings with 2 or sometimes 3 blades stacked in line on top of a pole, but were generally thought as ceremonial pole arms. Though the weapon saw frequent use in ancient China, the use of the dagger-axe decreased dramatically after the Qin and Han dynasties.

The Ji combines the dagger axe with a spear. By the medieval Chinese dynasties, with the decline of chariot warfare, the use of the dagger-axe was almost nonexistent. A guandao or kwan tou is a type of Chinese pole weapon. Some believed it comes from the late Han Era and was supposedly used by the late Eastern Han Dynasty general Guan Yu , but archaeological findings have shown that Han dynasty armies generally used straight, single-edged blades, and curved blades came several centuries later.

There is no reason to believe their pole arms had curved blades on them. Besides, historical accounts of the Three Kingdoms era describe Guan Yu thrusting his opponents down probably with a spear-like pole arm in battle, not cutting them down with a curved blade. The guandao is also known as the chun qiu da dao 'spring autumn great knife' , again probably related to the depiction of Guan Yu in the Ming dynasty novel Romance of the Three Kingdoms , but possibly a Ming author's invention.

It consists of a heavy blade mounted atop a 5-tofoot-long 1. The blade is very deep and curved on its face, resembling a Chinese saber, or dao. Variant designs include rings along the length of the straight back edge, as found in the nine-ring guandao.

The "elephant" guandao's tip curls into a rounded spiral, while the dragon head guandao features a more ornate design. A podao , 'long-handled sabre', is a Chinese pole arm, also known as the zhan ma dao 'horsecutter sabre' , which has a lighter blade and a ring at the end. A podao is an infantryman's weapon, mainly used for cutting the legs off oncoming charging horses to bring down the riders.

Known in Malay as a dap , it consists of a wooden shaft with a curved blade fashioned onto the end, and is similar in design to the Korean woldo.

The elephant warrior used the ngao like a blade from atop an elephant or horse during battle. Originally a Viking weapon, it was adopted by the Anglo-Saxons and Normans in the 11th century, spreading through Europe in the 12th and 13th centuries. In the 13th century, variants on the Danish axe are seen. In Ireland, this axe was known as a Sparr Axe. Originating in either Western Scotland or Ireland, the sparr was widely used by the galloglass. A fauchard is a type of pole arm which was used in medieval Europe from the 11th through the 14th centuries.

The design consisted of a curved blade put atop a 6-tofoot-long 1. The blade bore a moderate to strong curve along its length; however, unlike a bill or guisarme, the cutting edge was on the convex side. A guisarme sometimes gisarme , giserne or bisarme was a pole weapon used in Europe primarily between and It was used primarily to dismount knights and horsemen.

Like most pole arms it was developed by peasants by combining hand tools with long poles, in this case by putting a pruning hook onto a spear shaft. While hooks are fine for dismounting horsemen from mounts, they lack the stopping power of a spear especially when dealing with static opponents. While early designs were simply a hook on the end of a long pole, later designs implemented a small reverse spike on the back of the blade.

Eventually weapon makers incorporated the usefulness of the hook in a variety of different pole arms and guisarme became a catch-all for any weapon that included a hook on the blade. Ewart Oakeshott has proposed an alternative description of the weapon as a crescent shaped socketed axe. A glaive is a pole arm consisting of a single-edged tapering blade similar in shape to a modern kitchen knife on the end of a pole. Illustrations in the 13th century Maciejowski Bible show a short staffed weapon with a long blade used by both infantry and cavalry.

A voulge occasionally called a pole cleaver is a curved blade attached to a pole by binding the lower two-thirds of the blade to the side of the pole, to form a sort of axe. Looks very similar to a glaive. The illustrations often show the weapon being equipped with sword-like quillons. A naginata consists of a wood shaft with a curved blade on the end; it is descended from the Chinese guan dao.

Usually it also had a sword-like guard tsuba between the blade and shaft. It was mounted with a tang and held in place with a pin or pins, rather than going over the shaft using a socket. The Korean woldo was a variation of the Chinese guan dao. It was originally used by the medieval Shilla warriors.

Wielding the woldo took time due to its weight, but in the hands of a trained soldier, the woldo was a fearsome, agile weapon famous for enabling a single soldier to cut down ranks of infantrymen. The woldo was continually in use for the military in Korea with various modifications made over the decades. Unlike the Chinese with the guan dao, the Koreans found the woldo unwieldy on horseback, and thus, it was specifically tailored to the needs of infantrymen.

The Joseon government implemented rigorous training regimens requiring soldiers to be proficient with swordsmanship, and the use of the woldo.

Though it was never widely used as a standard weapon, the woldo saw action on many fronts and was considered by many Korean troops to be a versatile weapon. Recently, a contemporary revival in various martial arts in Korea has brought interest into the application of the woldo and its history. Surviving examples have a variety of head forms but there are two main variants, one with the side blades known as flukes or wings branching from the neck of the central blade at 45 degrees, the other with hooked blades curving back towards the haft.

The corseque is usually associated with the rawcon , ranseur and runka. Another possible association is with the "three-grayned staff" [18] listed as being in the armoury of Henry VIII in [19] though the same list also features 84 rawcons, suggesting the weapons were not identical in 16th century English eyes.

Another modern term used for particularly ornate-bladed corseques is the chauve-souris. A halberd or Swiss voulge is a two-handed pole weapon that came to prominent use during the 14th and 15th centuries but has continued in use as a ceremonial weapon to the present day. The halberd consists of an axe blade topped with a spike mounted on a long shaft. It always has a hook or thorn on the back side of the axe blade for grappling mounted combatants.

Early forms are very similar in many ways to certain forms of voulge , while 16th century and later forms are similar to the pollaxe.

The Swiss were famous users of the halberd in the medieval and renaissance eras, [22] with various cantons evolving regional variations of the basic form. In the 14th century, the basic long axe gained an armour piercing spike on the back and another on the end of the haft for thrusting.

This is similar to the pollaxe of 15th century. The poleaxe emerged in response to the need for a weapon that could penetrate plate armour and featured various combinations of an axe-blade, a back-spike and a hammer.

It was the favoured weapon for men-at-arms fighting on foot into the sixteenth century. See also Bec de corbin , lucerne hammer. From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. Elongated arms that have a metal tip. This section does not cite any sources.

Please help improve this section by adding citations to reliable sources. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed. February Learn how and when to remove this template message. A selection of Chinese pole weapons. Main article: Pike weapon. Notes on Arms and Armor.

London: Cassell. Painted Mountain. In the early Shang , the Mao appeared to have a relatively short shaft as well as a relatively narrow shaft as opposed to Mao in the later Shang and Western Zhou period. This practice of symbolically casting a spear into the enemy ranks at the start of a fight was sometimes used in historic clashes, to seek Odin's support in the coming battle. Woolly Blue Curls. Tsuru Noko "Chocolate".

Asian spears

Asian spears

Asian spears

Asian spears

Asian spears

Asian spears. Schrade Spear Extension Handle

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Cultivars are classified in two groups. Most of the cultivars belong to the Akanashi 'Russet pears' group, and have yellowish-brown rinds. The Aonashi 'Green pears' have yellow-green rinds. From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. Pashia Species: P. Hortus third: A concise dictionary of plants cultivated in the United States and Canada. New York: Macmillan. Retrieved 14 March Shingo on alcohol detoxification".

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Asian Swords & Spears stock vector. Illustration of isolated -

Due to its relative ease of manufacture, the spear in many variations was ubiquitous on the pre-modern Chinese battlefield.

It is known as one of the four major weapons, along with the gun staff , dao sabre , and the jian straight sword , called in this group " The King of Weapons ". Common features of the Chinese spear are the leaf shaped blade and red horse-hair tassel lashed just below. The tassel shows elite troop status. It also serves a tactical purpose. When the spear is moving quickly, the addition of the tassel aids in blurring the vision of the opponent so that it is more difficult for them to grab the shaft of spear behind the head or tip.

The tassel also served another purpose, to stop the flow of blood from the blade getting to the wooden shaft the blood would make it slippery, or sticky when dried. The length varied from around 9 feet long, increasing up to 21 feet.

According to general Qi Jiguang, the Ming military categorized spears above 9 feet as short spears, 14 feet as long spears, and spears below 9 feet as spiked staffs, which were used more for hitting than stabbing.

Spears used in war are typically made of hard wood. Martial arts wushu spears are typically made of wax wood , a lighter and more flexible wood better suited for performance; these are called flower spears. Many Chinese martial arts feature spear training in their curriculum. The conditioning provided by spear technique is seen as invaluable and in many styles it is the first weapons training introduced to students.

Moreover, some schools of empty handed fighting in China credit spear technique as their foundation, notably Xingyiquan and Bajiquan. From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. This article does not cite any sources. Please help improve this article by adding citations to reliable sources. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed. May Learn how and when to remove this template message. Pole weapons. Contemporary wushu. Hidden categories: Articles lacking sources from May All articles lacking sources Articles containing Chinese-language text Articles containing Vietnamese-language text Articles containing Korean-language text Articles containing Japanese-language text Articles containing simplified Chinese-language text Articles containing traditional Chinese-language text All stub articles.

Namespaces Article Talk. Views Read Edit View history. By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. Transcriptions Revised Romanization chang,chaeng.

Transcriptions Romanization yari. Wikimedia Commons has media related to Qiang spear. This article related to weaponry is a stub. You can help Wikipedia by expanding it.

Asian spears

Asian spears

Asian spears