Bleach in a well-Cleaning a Water Well

Shock chlorination is a disinfection treatment recommended when a domestic drinking water system is contaminated with bacteria. Contamination can occur when the well is installed or when repairs are made to the pump or plumbing. Shock chlorination should take care of contamination that is introduced during these activities. If the groundwater itself is the source of bacteria, the system will be contaminated again when that water is pumped into the plumbing. In that case, continuous chlorination or other disinfection methods will be necessary to ensure the safety of the water supply.

Bleach in a well

Tell us more about it? Even if the well is pumped "dry," there may still be many feet of chlorinated water left in the well below the Bleach in a well level. In addition, if you use too much water, the chlorine will end up in your septic tank and kill the bacteria necessary for decomposing waste. We recommend testing the water for bacteria if this was the initial problem before using the water for consumption. PK Peter K. By continuing to use our site, you agree to our cookie policy. Members of the American Society of Home Inspectors. This depends on the diameter of the well or casing in inches.

Crawford county babe ruth. Guide M-115

After that, Bleach in a well the water in the well for chlorine, and run the water in Bleachh part of your house until you detect chlorine. This makes it easier to monitor the water flow. Pumps are fairly expensive and if one must be replaced, the well will have to be chlorinated again! Water Pressure. Dell one Bleach in a well the process is complete! First and Last Name. Xxx films iowa chlorine in your septic system. Groundwater and Well Water. If you have a cartridge welll, be sure to have a spare cartridge because the filter may clog quickly. Not Helpful 36 Helpful Did this article help you? We recommend testing the water for bacteria if this was the initial problem before using the water for consumption. For these reasons, you will need to use bottled water for drinking and cooking, and refrain from using any sinks or showers. Unanswered Questions.

Members of the American Society of Home Inspectors.

  • I have well water and know there is iron in it.
  • When bacteria is found in a well the first step is to try to remove it by chlorinating the well.
  • The most common reason for this procedure is a bacteria problem, typically coliform bacteria.
  • Adding bleach to purify well water is perfectly normal and very effective.
  • Having your own well provides you with a source of fresh water.

Shock chlorination is a disinfection treatment recommended when a domestic drinking water system is contaminated with bacteria. Contamination can occur when the well is installed or when repairs are made to the pump or plumbing. Shock chlorination should take care of contamination that is introduced during these activities. If the groundwater itself is the source of bacteria, the system will be contaminated again when that water is pumped into the plumbing. In that case, continuous chlorination or other disinfection methods will be necessary to ensure the safety of the water supply.

Shock chlorination introduces very high levels of chlorine into a water system. During the disinfection process, water from the system is not suitable for consumption or extended contact by people or animals. Plan to perform the disinfection process when faucets and toilets will not be in use for at least 8 hours, preferably 12 to 24 hours. Shock chlorination will be most effective if the chlorine reaches every part of the water system.

Special precautions are needed on automatic water systems for animals and irrigation. Provide alternate water sources for pets or livestock who depend on automatic waterers, then make sure the chlorine reaches those outlets.

Chlorinated water flushed out of a sprinkler or drip system should be directed away from landscaping plants and lawn areas to avoid damage to the plants. Most water treatment equipment such as water heaters, softeners, and pressure tanks , should also be disinfected. Some water filters, such as carbon filters, should be temporarily disconnected or by-passed during shock chlorination. Check owner's manuals or manufacturers' literature before shock chlorinating to avoid damage to components.

Use liquid household bleach containing 5. Do not use bleach with a "fresh scent," lemon fragrance, or other cleaners added. One gallon of bleach will treat up to an 8-inch diameter well containing feet of water.

If your well is much larger, or if your distribution system is unusually large, expect to use more than 1 gallon of bleach. Avoid direct skin contact with bleach solutions. Wear rubber gloves, goggles, and a chemical-resistant apron when handling bleach.

If it accidentally gets on your skin, flush immediately with clean water. Never mix chlorine bleach with other cleaners; it may produce a toxic gas. Some chlorine may persist in the system for days. Water with a slight chlorine smell should be usable for most purposes. If the odor or taste is objectionable, simply let the water run until the chlorine dissipates.

Approximately 2 weeks after flushing the system, sample the water according to laboratory instructions and have it tested for biological contamination. Repeat the test in 2 to 3 months to be sure the system has not been recontaminated.

If water tests show that biological contamination has reappeared or persisted, try to locate and remove the source of bacteria. Human and animal wastes are common causes of bacterial contamination, so a nearby septic system or livestock pen could be the source.

If the follow-up water test shows no bacterial contamination, you should still test your water once a year. If there is a change in the taste or smell of your water, or if there are unexplained illnesses in the household, test the water as soon as you notice the change. For more information, contact your County Extension office.

Eubank, Wanda, Jerry D. Carpenter, Beverly A. Maltsberger and Nix Anderson. Wagenet, Linda and Ann Lemley. Disinfection Procedure Mix 2 quarts bleach in 10 gallons of water; pour into well. Connect a garden hose to a nearby faucet and wash down the inside of the well.

Open each faucet and let the water run until a strong chlorine odor is detected, then turn it off and go to the next one. Don't forget outdoor faucets and hydrants. Drain the water heater and let it refill with chlorinated water.

If a strong odor is not detected at all outlets, add more chlorine to the well. Flush the toilets. Mix an additional 2 quarts bleach in 10 gallons of water. Pour it into the well without pumping. Allow chlorinated water to stand in the well and pipes for at least 8 hours preferably 12 to 24 hours.

Run water from outdoor faucets to waste away from desirable vegetation until the chlorine odor is slight or not detected at each faucet. Then run indoor faucets until there is no chlorine odor. Minimize the amount of chlorinated water flowing into a septic tank. References Eubank, Wanda, Jerry D. Mancl, Karen. Printed: October Electronic Distribution: October

Do not leave running hoses unattended. It helps to tie the hoses around a tree or fence about 3 feet off the ground so the water flow can be easily monitored. Monitor the chlorine level and after some time, you should see the level decrease gradually as fresh water enters the well and dilutes the treated water in well. GB Gail Burke Sep 23, Well water and liquid bleach are just not very compatible.

Bleach in a well

Bleach in a well

Bleach in a well

Bleach in a well

Bleach in a well

Bleach in a well. About Dr. Laundry

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How to Chlorinate a Well (with Pictures) - wikiHow

Members of the American Society of Home Inspectors. E-Mail: office professionalhome. Visit us on Facebook. Chlorinating or "shocking" the system is the standard method of cleaning a well. Bear in mind that the purpose of this operation is to clean the system to a point where the water that is produced will pass a laboratory analysis. For this procedure to be successful, the entire system must be cleaned at the same time to avoid rapid recontamination.

The theory is simple: dump bleach down the well to kill the bacteria. However, the actual procedure is time consuming and needs to be done in a systematic way. Professional Home Inspection Service provides a chlorination service for its clients, if needed, but handy homeowners may be able to perform the service for themselves.

Prior to cleaning the system, purchase an inexpensive pool chlorine test kit. This will be needed to tell when all the chlorine has been flushed out of the system before you re-test. Note: you can't rely on smell for this. Start the process by removing the well cap and pouring in one gallon of bleach. If the well head is not exposed buried , it will need to be dug up and extended above grade for this procedure, and to make the well accessible for future routine maintenance.

If the water source is a spring, lake, shallow well or a hand-dug well, skip this procedure and install a water purification system. By definition, these types of water sources are providing "surface water" which will inevitably include bacteria. There is no way to clean them, so continuous purification will be necessary. Once the bleach is in the well, it needs to be pumped through the entire system. Open a hose bib until you can smell bleach, shut off, then open each tap until you smell bleach.

There's no science regarding the amount of bleach to add. If you can smell it at the fixtures, there's enough. If you can't smell bleach after running the water for about 30 minutes, add another gallon.

In a small percentage of wells, the aquifer is flowing so rapidly that it's not possible to chlorinate. Any bleach that is added is immediately swept away. In these systems, it's necessary to install a water purification system. Once chlorine is detected at each fixture, attach a potable water hose to the hose bib and use it to spray down the interior of the well casing. This will disinfect the entire casing, not just the portion below the current water level.

Don't forget to spray the cap. Once the well casing is clean, put the cap back on and let the entire system sit over night. You'll need to have bottled water on hand for drinking, cooking and washing. The chlorinated water can be used for flushing the toilet, but be careful.

The bleach may irritate skin or damage clothing. It's important to note that chlorinating the well will rile up the water and a lot of sediment and rust flakes will come out through the faucets. Aerators should be removed during this procedure to avoid clogging. Sediment filters should be replaced when the cleaning process is complete. After eight hours or overnight, the chlorine has to be flushed out.

This can be a muti-day process. First, hook up a hose and flush the chlorine from the system. The chlorinated water should be discharged to an area where it won't do any harm, e. This should be run until the water is clear and any chlorine odor is minimal. Then run water at each tap until the chlorine odor is gone, and verify with the chlorine test tablets.

In practice, removing all the chlorine can take a couple of days or longer. The best strategy is to pump the water out of the well quickly, depending on the capabilities of the well. Often the well is pumped down for a couple of hours, allowed to recover, and pumped down again until no chlorine is detected with the pool test kit. Even if the well is pumped "dry," there may still be many feet of chlorinated water left in the well below the pump level.

There should be no concern about burning out a modern submersible pump during this process. These pumps are rated for continuous duty. Also, the motor remains submerged. However, the water discharge should be monitored for excessive sediment as the level is being drawn down, and should be stopped if necessary.

Keep in mind too that jet pumps may not be rated for continuous duty and should be monitored for overheating. If a well with a jet pump is drawn dry it will need to be primed. Have clean water handy for priming. Once the well system has been cleaned by chlorinating, the water should be re-tested.

If it comes back from the lab with a seal of approval, proceed to the final step-monitor and maintain. If the test fails, the cleaning process should be repeated. We often find that the first chlorinating is done in a casual manner. But once the well has failed a second time, a more thorough cleaning job is done with better results. Also, some of the bacteria can resist the chlorine for a period of time, and often a second cleaning eradicates this problem.

If a second cleaning doesn't work, installation of a purification system is recommended. Simply passing a single coliform test tells us nothing about the long-term quality of the water. The source for the initial contamination may very well remain. Sources of contamination may include a poor seal at the cap, a poor seal at the pitless adapter, a leak in the piping between the well and the house, and poor grading or ponding water around the well casing.

The only way to have confidence in the potability of the water supply is through an on-going testing program. This program should include regular testing and keeping a running record of the results. There are no state-mandated testing requirements for private-use wells in New York, although the state has a lot of information available in a publication called, "Rural Water Supply", and annual testing is recommended.

Wells used in commercial facilities, such as restaurants, are required to be tested for coliform bacteria quarterly and for nitrates and nitrites annually. For a private well that has failed a potability test, or for a well that does not have a documented testing history we recommend testing once a week for a month to obtain some initial confidence in the water quality and then following the quarterly schedule previously discussed.

If the testing program shows that the well doesn't stay clean for a reasonable amount of time, we recommend that a water purification system be installed. Alternately a new well may be an option if the aquifers are not the contamination source. Maintenance of the system includes changing filters as necessary and cleaning the well when testing dictates.

Professional Home Inspection Service. To Navigation Menu. Cleaning a Water Well System Chlorinating or "shocking" the system is the standard method of cleaning a well. However, the water discharge should be monitored for excessive sediment as the level is being drawn down, and should be stopped if necessary Keep in mind too that jet pumps may not be rated for continuous duty and should be monitored for overheating.

Wells used in commercial facilities, such as restaurants, are required to be tested for coliform bacteria quarterly and for nitrates and nitrites annually For a private well that has failed a potability test, or for a well that does not have a documented testing history we recommend testing once a week for a month to obtain some initial confidence in the water quality and then following the quarterly schedule previously discussed.

Bleach in a well

Bleach in a well