Cause of male orgasm-What can cause orgasm problems in men? - NHS

Back to Sexual health. These are often associated with ejaculation problems , but not always. When a man has an orgasm, he usually ejaculates at the same time. The semen produced is squirted out of the penis ejaculation. The male orgasm lasts from just before the semen first spurts out until the last semen is ejaculated.

Cause of male orgasm

Cause of male orgasm

We have quite literally tried "everything in the book", yet we have not found a solution. Once mle has learned to control these muscles, he practices tightening them while his bladder is empty. The condition is persistent or occurs frequently and causes significant distress. Dr Berry. In the majority of cases, psychotherapy will Cause of male orgasm suggested even in those cases where psychological factors are secondary rather than the primary mechanism for the disorder. Demographics Male orgasmic disorder is found in all races and ethnic groups. Whereas premature ejaculation is rarely caused by disease, delayed or absent ejaculation can result from either psychological or physical problems. These Yellow breasted sap sucker help in diagnosing an underlying cause and determining what might be the most effective treatment. The term emission refers to a sensation of impending ejaculation orgawm by contractions of the prostate gland, seminal vesicles, and urethra accompanied by generalized muscular tension, perineal contractions, and involuntary pelvic thrusting. Sometimes, it does get frustrating.

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In a survey of midwives who had assisted with overbirths, there were births in which sensations akin to an orgasm occurred. Physical causes of Male Orgasmic Disorder include hypogonadism testes do not produce enough testosteronethyroid disorders, diseases of the nervous system, diseases of the penis, surgery, substance abuse and certain medications. While men might have a hard time giving women orgasms, women are quite good at giving themselves orgasms, courtesy of an elevated capacity to be multi-orgasmic. The testicles are drawn up toward the body as the scrotum tightens. People of all genders can experience orgasm disorders. Indeed, some natural cures for erectile dysfunction contain Maca. The wikipedia article on orgasm does not really discuss the psychological and neurological basis for why it is so pleasurable. Contractions in the pelvic floor Loverboy usa male strippers and prostate gland also cause the semen to be forced out of the penis in a process called ejaculation. Not coincidentally, this reward pathway is what makes certain drugs so addicting i. Although orgasms are considered to be the same in all genders, healthcare professionals tend to describe orgasm disorders in gendered terms. This is accomplished through the rhythmic muscular contractions of the pelvic region that characterize orgasm, notes Dr. The brain is a part of the Cause of male orgasm system, and Cause of male orgasm function together to help create what we experience as orgasm. The body gradually returns to its former state, with swelling reduction and the slowing of pulse and breathing. This term can be divided into primary anorgasmia, when a woman has never experienced an orgasm, and secondary anorgasmia, when a woman who previously experienced orgasms no longer can. You will need to reference the wikipedia article or, if you're more serious, a neuroscience textbook on the limbic system see: The Limbic System from Purves' Neuroscience text.

Overall though, not a great deal is known about the orgasm, and over the past century, theories about the orgasm and its nature have shifted dramatically.

  • Here are five.
  • Male Orgasmic Disorder is characterized by the delay or absence of an orgasm, despite sufficient arousal or lengthy sexual acts.
  • When men in steady relationships contemplate their sexual woes, erectile dysfunction ED is usually at the top of the list.
  • Before the scientific advances that led to the development of in vivo fertilization, the male orgasm was directly responsible for the existence of every human being in history.

Male orgasmic disorder may be defined as a persistent or recurrent inability to achieve orgasm despite lengthy sexual contact or while participating in sexual intercourse. The mental health professional's handbook, the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders DSM-IV-TR , includes this disorder among the sexual dysfunctions , along with premature ejaculation , dyspareunia , and others.

The individual affected by male orgasmic disorder is unable to experience an orgasm following a normal sexual excitement phase. The affected man may regularly experience delays in orgasm, or may be unable to experience orgasm altogether. First, it is important to this discussion to understand the characteristics of a "normal" orgasm. The sensation of orgasm in the male includes emission followed by ejaculation. The term emission refers to a sensation of impending ejaculation produced by contractions of the prostate gland, seminal vesicles, and urethra accompanied by generalized muscular tension, perineal contractions, and involuntary pelvic thrusting.

Orgasm is followed by a period of resolution characterized by feelings of well-being and generalized muscular relaxation.

During this phase, men may be unable to respond to further sexual stimulation, erection, and orgasm for a variable period of time. It is also important to distinguish orgasm from ejaculation, although in most instances they occur almost simultaneously. Orgasm is a peak emotional and physical experience, whereas ejaculation is simply a reflex action occurring at the lower portion of the spinal cord and resulting in ejection of semen.

Some men have been able to recognize the separation of the two processes, enabling them to experience multiple orgasms without the occurrence of ejaculation. Once ejaculation takes place, a period of recovery time is required prior to a subsequent orgasm. The sensation of orgasm differs between individuals, and individual orgasms may differ in the same person. All orgasms share certain characteristics in common including rhythmic body and pelvic contractions, elevation of the heart rate, systemic hypertension, hyperventilation, and muscle tension, followed by the sudden release of tension.

The cycle of sexual response is under the control of a balanced interplay between the two major nervous systems, the sympathetic and the parasympathetic. In general, the sympathetic nervous system prompts action whereas the parasympathetic system's main action is recovery and calming.

In order for a penis to become erect, its smooth muscles are relaxed and it becomes congested with blood vessels. This process is mediated by a complex cascade of humoral, neurological and circulatory events in which the parasympathetic nervous system plays a key role.

Orgasm and ejaculation and subsequent relaxation of the penis are predominantly functions of the sympathetic nervous system. Thus, whereas emission is a balanced interplay between the parasympathetic and sympathetic nervous systems, orgasm and ejaculation are predominantly under the control of the sympathetic nervous system.

The mechanisms of this system may be blocked by impaired function of the brain or of the hormonal, circulatory, and neurological systems. Additionally, certain medications may block these actions. Abnormalities in these processes may be "primary" or "secondary. Secondary abnormalities are acquired after a period of normal function. If an orgasmic problem only occurs under a particular set of circumstances, or only with certain sexual partners, the condition is considered to be "situational" rather than "generalized" occurring regardless of the circumstances or partner.

The defect in sexual function may be total or partial. The evidence strongly suggests that orgasm has more to do with the brain than with the body. Electrode stimulation of certain parts of the brain will produce sexual pleasure similar to that produced by physical stimulation. The fact that orgasm occurs during sleep is supportive of this concept. The cause of male orgasmic disorders may be organic related to a condition in the body , but, in most cases, is of psychological origin.

It is important for the physician to make every effort to find an underlying cause because the therapy and prognosis depend upon it. A detailed history including an interview with the sexual partner, if feasible , a general physical examination, the performance of certain laboratory and, in some cases, special tests, are important in the investigation of the underlying cause of the male orgasmic disorder.

The most common causes of the male orgasmic syndrome are psychological in nature. The responsible psychological mechanisms may be "intrinsic" due to basic internal factors , or "extrinsic" due to external or environmental factors. Environmental factors may interfere with sexual functioning. There may be no safe, private place in which the patient can exercise sexual activity or he may be too fatigued from other activities to participate sexually.

The difficulties in striving for "safe sex" and the psychological effects and stresses that may result from homosexuality may also interfere with sexual function. In addition to specific symptoms involving sexual function inability or delay in reaching orgasm after sufficient stimulation , most patients complain of anxiety, guilt, shame and frustration, and many develop bodily complaints on a psychological basis.

Although sexual dysfunction usually occurs during sexual activity with a partner, the clinician should inquire about sexual function during masturbation. If problems occur during masturbation, the problem probably has nothing to do with the sexual partner. The physician should differentiate male orgasmic disorder from other sexual disorders such as retarded or delayed ejaculation and retrograde ejaculation.

In both of these conditions, orgasm occurs but is delayed or, in the case of retrograde ejaculation, occurs in a retrograde direction into the bladder. Male orgasmic disorder is found in all races and ethnic groups. In the case of the lifelong type of the disorder, manifestations will occur around the age of puberty. In certain genetic hypogonadism disorders, such as Klinefelter's syndrome, certain bodily signs and symptoms may alert the physician.

Similarly, in associated thyroid, testicular and pituitary abnormalities, there may be other manifestations of the underlying disorder. In the acquired type of male orgasmic disorder, the patient will have had the previous experience of normal sexual function. In these cases, it is usually a situational factor that precipitates the disorder. Male orgasmic disorder may be part of a complex of sexual malfunctioning that may include erectile dysfunction , abnormalities in ejaculation such as premature ejaculation or retrograde ejaculation , and hypoactive sexual desire disorder.

Blood plasma levels of testosterone are of help in diagnosing hypogonadism. A number of tests of thyroid, pituitary and adrenal function are available to diagnose hormonal abnormalities of those glands. A test for nocturnal penile erections may be performed to diagnose erectile dysfunction. If an extrinsic mechanism is discovered as the cause of the orgasmic disorder, steps should be taken to eliminate or ameliorate the problem.

An example would be substance or alcohol abuse or the use of certain provocative medications. In the case of antihypertensives, for example, a number of equally effective agents are available if the one in current use is suspect.

Therapy should be directed toward improvement of concurrent conditions such as diabetes that may be having an adverse effect on sexual function. Environmental factors that interfere with sexual activity should be corrected. In the majority of cases, psychotherapy will be suggested even in those cases where psychological factors are secondary rather than the primary mechanism for the disorder.

Such treatment should be rendered by therapists with special training in the disorders of sexual function and who can tactfully evaluate the sexual compatibility of the patient and his partner. Treatment usually requires the support of the sexual partner in improving both the psychological as well as the physical aspects of the problem. A step-wise program of partner stimulation of the patient to initially ejaculate outside the vagina, then at the vaginal labia, and finally inside the vagina may be helpful.

The prognosis of the patient with male orgasmic syndrome is dependent on whether the condition is lifelong or acquired and the condition's causes. Prognosis is best when it can be demonstrated that the condition is related to some extrinsic or environmental factor that can be corrected or ameliorated.

The prognosis is also favorable in those cases that are due to a remedial organic condition such as a thyroid disorder or hypogonadism. The prognosis is guarded when the disorder is found to be secondary to a deep-seated and chronic psychological or actual psychiatric problem that, in itself, carries an unfavorable prognosis. There are no definitive steps that can be taken to prevent the onset of the male orgasmic disorder.

Prompt recognition of the syndrome is important so that appropriate therapy can be attempted as early as possible. As with many chronic conditions, the longer the condition exists, the more difficult therapy becomes. American Psychiatric Association. Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders. Lue, Tom F. Volume 1. New York: Current Medicine, Masters, William and Virginia Johnson. Masters and Johnson on Sex and Human Loving. New York: Little, Brown, Steidle, Christopher P.

The Impotence Source Book. Los Angeles: Howell House, Toggle navigation. Photo by: CURAphotography. Definition Male orgasmic disorder may be defined as a persistent or recurrent inability to achieve orgasm despite lengthy sexual contact or while participating in sexual intercourse.

Description The individual affected by male orgasmic disorder is unable to experience an orgasm following a normal sexual excitement phase. Normal orgasm First, it is important to this discussion to understand the characteristics of a "normal" orgasm.

The physiological mechanism of normal orgasm The cycle of sexual response is under the control of a balanced interplay between the two major nervous systems, the sympathetic and the parasympathetic. Abnormalities affecting the process of orgasm Abnormalities in these processes may be "primary" or "secondary.

Causes The cause of male orgasmic disorders may be organic related to a condition in the body , but, in most cases, is of psychological origin. Organic causes of male orgasmic disorder include the following: Hypogonadism, in which the testes do not produce enough testosterone. Thyroid disorders both hyperthyroidism—too much thyroid hormone— and hypothyroidism, or abnormally low levels of thyroid hormone.

Pituitary conditions Cushing's syndrome, excessive production of the hormone that induces lactation called prolactin.

Diseases that affect the nervous system, such as strokes, multiple sclerosis, diabetic neuropathy, spinal cord injuries. Surgery affecting the prostate and other pelvic organs. Diseases of the penis. Substance abuse, including alcohol. Certain medications. Some of these medications include: the phenothiazines [antipsychotics such as chlorpromazine Thorazine or trifluoperazine Stelazine ]; certain medications used to treat high blood pressure, including the thiazides [such as triamterene Dyazide or spironolactone Aldactone ] and beta blockers [such as propranolol Inderal ]; and the tricyclic antidepressants such as doxepin Sinequan and protriptyline Vivactil.

Intrinsic psychological factors that may cause male orgasmic disorder include: depression feelings of guilt, anger, fear, low self-esteem, and anxiety fear of getting the partner pregnant or of contracting a sexually transmitted disease or HIV Extrinsic psychological factors that may cause male orgasmic disorder include: living under conditions that cause undue stress unsatisfactory relationship with sexual partner past history of traumatic sexual encounters such as sexual abuse, rape or incest having been raised in an atmosphere of strict sexual taboos Environmental factors may interfere with sexual functioning.

Symptoms In order to be diagnosed with male orgasmic disorder, the following symptoms must be present according to the DSM-IV-TR : Persistent or recurrent delay in, or absence of, orgasm following a normal sexual excitement phase during sexual activity that the clinician judges to be adequate.

When men in steady relationships contemplate their sexual woes, erectile dysfunction ED is usually at the top of the list. Heart rate and breathing quicken and blood pressure increases. I'm primarily interested in answers relating to the male orgasm It apparently did. While men might have a hard time giving women orgasms, women are quite good at giving themselves orgasms, courtesy of an elevated capacity to be multi-orgasmic. Professional psychological help can assist you in getting to the root of the problem, whether it is anxiety, stress, fear or depression.

Cause of male orgasm

Cause of male orgasm

Cause of male orgasm

Cause of male orgasm

Cause of male orgasm. Pre-Ejaculatory Fluid

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Premature ejaculation: Treatments and causes

Overall though, not a great deal is known about the orgasm, and over the past century, theories about the orgasm and its nature have shifted dramatically. For instance, healthcare experts have only relatively recently come round to the idea of the female orgasm, with many doctors as recently as the s claiming that it was normal for women not to experience them.

In this article, we will explain what an orgasm is in men and women, why it happens, and explain some common misconceptions. Orgasms can be defined in different ways using different criteria.

Medical professionals have used physiological changes to the body as a basis for a definition, whereas psychologists and mental health professionals have used emotional and cognitive changes. A single, overarching explanation of the orgasm does not currently exist. Alfred Kinsey's Sexual Behavior in the Human Male and Sexual Behavior in the Human Female sought to build "an objectively determined body of fact and sex," through the use of in-depth interviews, challenging currently held views about sex.

The spirit of this work was taken forward by William H. Masters and Virginia Johnson in their work, Human Sexual Response - a real-time observational study of the physiological effects of various sexual acts. This research led to the establishment of sexology as a scientific discipline and is still an important part of today's theories on orgasms. Sex researchers have defined orgasms within staged models of sexual response. Although the orgasm process can differ greatly between individuals, several basic physiological changes have been identified that tend to occur in the majority of incidences.

The following models are patterns that have been found to occur in all forms of sexual response and are not limited solely to penile-vaginal intercourse. Kaplan's model differs from most other sexual response models as it includes desire - most models tend to avoid including non-genital changes.

It is also important to note that not all sexual activity is preceded by desire. A cohort study published in suggested that the risk of mortality was considerably lower in men with a high frequency of orgasm than men with a low frequency of orgasm. This is counter to the view in many cultures worldwide that the pleasure of the orgasm is "secured at the cost of vigor and wellbeing. There is some evidence that frequent ejaculation might reduce the risk of prostate cancer.

A team of researchers found that the risk for prostate cancer was 20 percent lower in men who ejaculated at least 21 times a month compared with men who ejaculated just 4 to 7 times a month.

Several hormones that are released during orgasm have been identified, such as oxytocin and DHEA; some studies suggest that these hormones could have protective qualities against cancers and heart disease. Oxytocin and other endorphins released during male and female orgasm have also been found to work as relaxants.

Unsurprisingly, given that experts are yet to come to a consensus regarding the definition of an orgasm, there are multiple different forms of categorization for orgasms. The psychoanalyst Sigmund Freud distinguished female orgasms as clitoral in the young and immature, and vaginal in those with a healthy sexual response.

In contrast, the sex researcher Betty Dodson has defined at least nine different forms of orgasm, biased toward genital stimulation, based on her research. Here is a selection of them:. There are other forms of orgasm that Freud and Dodson largely discount, but many others have described them. For instance:. The following description of the physiological process of female orgasm in the genitals will use the Masters and Johnson four-phase model.

When a woman is stimulated physically or psychologically, the blood vessels within her genitals dilate. Increased blood supply causes the vulva to swell, and fluid to pass through the vaginal walls, making the vulva swollen and wet.

Internally, the top of the vagina expands. Expert, evidence-based advice delivered straight to your inbox to help you take control of your health.

Heart rate and breathing quicken and blood pressure increases. Blood vessel dilation can lead to the woman appearing flushed, particularly on the neck and chest. As blood flow to the introitus - the lower area of the vagina - reaches its limit, it becomes firm. Breasts can increase in size by as much as 25 percent and increased blood flow to the areola - the area surrounding the nipple - causes the nipples to appear less erect.

The clitoris pulls back against the pubic bone, seemingly disappearing. The genital muscles, including the uterus and introitus, experience rhythmic contractions around 0. The female orgasm typically lasts longer than the male at an average of around seconds.

Unlike men, most women do not have a refractory recovery period and so can have further orgasms if they are stimulated again. The body gradually returns to its former state, with swelling reduction and the slowing of pulse and breathing. The following description of the physiological process of male orgasm in the genitals uses the Masters and Johnson four-phase model. When a man is stimulated physically or psychologically, he gets an erection. Blood flows into the corpora - the spongy tissue running the length of the penis - causing the penis to grow in size and become rigid.

The testicles are drawn up toward the body as the scrotum tightens. As the blood vessels in and around the penis fill with blood, the glans and testicles increase in size. In addition, thigh and buttock muscles tense, blood pressure rises, the pulse quickens, and the rate of breathing increases.

Semen - a mixture of sperm 5 percent and fluid 95 percent - is forced into the urethra by a series of contractions in the pelvic floor muscles, prostate gland, seminal vesicles, and the vas deferens.

Contractions in the pelvic floor muscles and prostate gland also cause the semen to be forced out of the penis in a process called ejaculation. The average male orgasm lasts for seconds. The man now enters a temporary recovery phase where further orgasms are not possible. This is known as the refractory period, and its length varies from person to person.

It can last from a few minutes to a few days, and this period generally grows longer as the man ages. During this phase, the man's penis and testicles return to their original size. The rate of breathing will be heavy and fast, and the pulse will be fast. It is commonly held that orgasms are a sexual experience, typically experienced as part of a sexual response cycle. They often occur following the continual stimulation of erogenous zones, such as the genitals, anus, nipples, and perineum.

There have been other reports of people experiencing orgasmic sensations at the onset of epileptic medicine, and foot amputees feeling orgasms in the space where their foot once was. People paralyzed from the waist down have also been able to have orgasms, suggesting that it is the central nervous system rather than the genitals that is key to experiencing orgasms.

A number of disorders are associated with orgasms; they can lead to distress, frustration, and feelings of shame, both for the person experiencing the symptoms and their partner s. Although orgasms are considered to be the same in all genders, healthcare professionals tend to describe orgasm disorders in gendered terms.

Female orgasmic disorders center around the absence or significant delay of orgasm following sufficient stimulation. The absence of having orgasms is also referred to as anorgasmia. This term can be divided into primary anorgasmia, when a woman has never experienced an orgasm, and secondary anorgasmia, when a woman who previously experienced orgasms no longer can.

The condition can be limited to certain situations or can generally occur. Female orgasmic disorder can occur as the result of physical causes such as gynecological issues or the use of certain medications, or psychological causes such as anxiety or depression.

Also referred to as inhibited male orgasm, male orgasmic disorder involves a persistent and recurrent delay or absence of orgasm following sufficient stimulation. Male orgasmic disorder can be a lifelong condition or one that is acquired after a period of regular sexual functioning. It can occur as the result of other physical conditions such as heart disease, psychological causes such as anxiety, or through the use of certain medications such as antidepressants.

Ejaculation in men is closely associated with an orgasm. Premature ejaculation is a common sexual complaint, whereby a man ejaculates and typically orgasms within 1 minute of penetration, including the moment of penetration itself.

Premature ejaculation is likely to be caused by a combination of psychological factors such as guilt or anxiety, and biological factors such as hormone levels or nerve damage.

The high importance that society places on sex, combined with our incomplete knowledge of the orgasm, has led to a number of common misconceptions. Sexual culture has placed the orgasm on a pedestal, often prizing it as the one and only goal for sexual encounters. It is estimated that around percent of women have never had an orgasm. In men, as many as 1 in 3 reports having experienced premature ejaculation at some point in their lives. Research has shown that orgasms are also not widely considered to be the most important aspect of sexual experience.

One study reported that many women find their most satisfying sexual experiences involve a feeling of being connected to someone else, rather than basing their satisfaction solely on orgasm. Another misconception is that penile-vaginal stimulation is the main way for both men and women to achieve an orgasm.

While this may be true for many men and some women, many more women experience orgasms following the stimulation of the clitoris. A comprehensive analysis of 33 studies over 80 years found that during vaginal intercourse just 25 percent of women consistently experience an orgasm, about half of women sometimes have an orgasm, 20 percent seldom or ever have orgasms, and about 5 percent never have orgasms.

In fact, orgasms do not necessarily have to involve the genitals at all, nor do they have to be associated with sexual desires, as evidenced by examples of exercise-induced orgasm. Another common misconception is that transgender people are unable to orgasm after gender reassignment surgery. Another study in showed that A further The journey to an orgasm is a very individual experience that has no singular, all-encompassing definition.

In many cases, experts recommend avoiding comparison to other people or pre-existing concepts of what an orgasm should be. Read this article in Spanish. Table of contents What is an orgasm? Fast facts on orgasms Orgasms have multiple potential health benefits due to the hormones and other chemicals that are released by the body during an orgasm.

Orgasms do not only occur during sexual stimulation. People of all genders can experience orgasm disorders. An estimated 1 in 3 men have experienced premature ejaculation. Trans people are able to orgasm after gender reassignment surgery. Medical professionals and mental health professionals define orgasms differently. The male orgasm may protect against prostate cancer. Stay in the know. Expert, evidence-based advice delivered straight to your inbox to help you take control of your health Sign Up.

Premature ejaculation: Treatments and causes.

Cause of male orgasm