Swollen feet on long flights-Why Feet and Ankles Swell on Planes | Travel + Leisure

If you're stuck sitting with the seatbelt light illuminated, flex and extend your ankles, knees, and legs as much as possible. Swelling that does not go down after a few hours after the flight and the resumption of normal activity may be due to something more serious, such as a blood clot also known as deep vein thrombosis. Other signs of this condition include swelling that occurs only in one leg, or is accompanied by leg pain. Seek immediate medical attention if you experience any of these symptoms. Compression socks can help mitigate the effects, while a short-term prescription for a blood thinner can prevent clotting.

Swollen feet on long flights

Swollen feet on long flights

Swollen feet on long flights

Clinical manifestations and diagnosis of edema in Chick on quads. Here are 10 tips to promote foot health during air travel. All rights reserved. I'm going to look 'pretty'!!! Accessed Sept. So much so that I always wear sandals with velcro straps--otherwise, I can't get the shoe on at all at the end of the flihgts. This content does not have an Arabic version.

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Step 2 Stand up every half hour as permitted. Many flights are in North America. An interesting thing to remember is that a window seat is a risk factor for blood clots in the leg veins. Only In Your State. Remember that one of the main forces that keeps fluid in the veins is the compression of the veins by surrounding muscles. Last Name. Raise your feet. Amateur radio jargon and extend your legs to stretch your ankles and knees. In truth, this is a difficult question to answer. Flighs Name.

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If you're stuck sitting with the seatbelt light illuminated, flex and extend your ankles, knees, and legs as much as possible. Swelling that does not go down after a few hours after the flight and the resumption of normal activity may be due to something more serious, such as a blood clot also known as deep vein thrombosis.

Other signs of this condition include swelling that occurs only in one leg, or is accompanied by leg pain. Seek immediate medical attention if you experience any of these symptoms. Compression socks can help mitigate the effects, while a short-term prescription for a blood thinner can prevent clotting. For the vast majority of flyers, however, swollen ankles and feet is no big deal.

Get up, move around, drink water, check in with your body, and contact a doctor if necessary. And, while this may go without saying, remember that it never hurts to wear comfortable shoes. By Molly McArdle July 01, Pin FB ellipsis More. Image zoom. Getty Images. Close Share options. All rights reserved. Close View image.

When you're dehydrated, your blood gets a bit thicker, which also reduces circulation. You can do it yourself or have someone help you. This way, your body will be well hydrated. Flying is very common. Drink lots of water to stay hydrated and avoid alcohol and caffeinated drinks, which are dehydrating. Store your baggage in the overhead bin so you have room to stretch out your legs and flex your ankles regularly.

Swollen feet on long flights

Swollen feet on long flights

Swollen feet on long flights

Swollen feet on long flights

Swollen feet on long flights. Travel Tips Video

Long-haul flights may get notoriously uncomfortable, but even an hour or two in the air can lead to swelling in your legs.

Being in a cramped space with little room to move your legs slows down your blood flow. Taking preventative measures helps reduce the risk of serious problems, such as blood clots, while exercise and a leg massage can cure basic swelling after your air travel.

Sitting for an extended period of time often causes blood to pool in your legs, with no muscle movement to usher fluid out of your legs. Cabin air pressure can also lead to dehydration, which makes your blood thicker and more likely to pool.

Typically, this swelling only lasts for a few hours after your plane ride. Sometimes blood that pools in your legs forms blood clots, which then restrict blood flow in your veins. Swelling in one leg may indicate a blood clot, or deep vein thrombosis DVT. Other symptoms include warmth and pain in the affected leg. When you lower your legs from being propped up or move from a sitting position to standing, you may notice sharp pain in the affected leg where blood is pooling on top of the blood clot.

To improve your circulation on a flight, avoid salt the day before travel and wear loose clothing on the plane. Wear support stockings for additional prevention. Stand up every half hour as permitted. Stretch your legs and take a short walk up and down the aisles of the plane. Drink lots of water to stay hydrated and avoid alcohol and caffeinated drinks, which are dehydrating.

Change your seating position as much as possible and avoid crossing your legs. Flex and extend your legs to stretch your ankles and knees. Massage your feet, ankles, legs and knees to help the blood flow. Exercise your feet by alternating between bending them upward, spreading the toes and holding for three seconds, and pointing them down, clenching the toes and holding this position for three seconds. Based in Atlanta, Renee Kristi has been writing since and her work now appears on various websites.

Only In Your State. Renee Kristi, Leaf Group. Step 1 Reserve an aisle or exit row seat to allow yourself extra leg room. Step 2 Stand up every half hour as permitted. Step 3 Change your seating position as much as possible and avoid crossing your legs. Step 4 Massage your feet, ankles, legs and knees to help the blood flow. Tips Consult your doctor before flying if you are at increased risk for blood clots due to a condition or medication.

Swollen Ankles & Feet After Airline Travel | USA Today

Leg and foot swelling during air travel is common and typically harmless. The most likely culprit is inactivity during a flight. Sitting with your feet on the floor for a long period causes blood to pool in your leg veins. The position of your legs when you are seated also increases pressure in your leg veins. This contributes to foot swelling by causing fluid to leave the blood and move into the surrounding soft tissues.

Foot swelling isn't a serious problem if it lasts only a short time. But excessive swelling that persists for several hours after you resume activity may be due to a more serious condition, such as a blood clot in the leg deep vein thrombosis. If you have swelling in only one leg and also have leg pain, seek prompt medical care. If you're at increased risk of blood clots — because you recently had major surgery or you take birth control pills, for example — talk with your doctor before flying.

He or she may recommend wearing compression stockings during your flight. In some cases, your doctor may prescribe a blood-thinning medication to be taken before departure. Sheldon G. Sheps, M. Mayo Clinic does not endorse companies or products. Advertising revenue supports our not-for-profit mission. Any use of this site constitutes your agreement to the Terms and Conditions and Privacy Policy linked below. Mayo Clinic is a nonprofit organization and proceeds from Web advertising help support our mission.

Mayo Clinic does not endorse any of the third party products and services advertised. A single copy of these materials may be reprinted for noncommercial personal use only. This content does not have an English version. This content does not have an Arabic version. Make an appointment. Visit now. Explore now. Choose a degree. Get updates. Give today. Request Appointment. Foot swelling during air travel: A concern?

Products and services. Free E-newsletter Subscribe to Housecall Our general interest e-newsletter keeps you up to date on a wide variety of health topics. Sign up now. What causes leg and foot swelling during air travel? Answer From Sheldon G.

With Sheldon G. Show references Bauer KA, et al. Overview of the causes of venous thrombosis. Accessed Sept. Pai M, et al. Prevention of venous thromboembolism in adult travelers. Deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Goldman L, et al. Approach to the patient before and after travel. In: Goldman-Cecil Medicine. Philadelphia, Pa. Health considerations for air travelers. Rochester, Minn. Johnston RV, et al. Travelers' thrombosis.

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Swollen feet on long flights