Teen reead week-About Teen Read Week | Young Adult Library Services Association (YALSA)

Teen Read Week is a time to celebrate reading for fun while encouraging teens to take advantage of reading in all its forms —books, magazines, e-books, audiobooks and more! It is also a great opportunity to encourage teens to become regular library users. In recent years, many families have had to adapt to make do with less as a result of the economy. Teen Read Week is a great opportunity for teens and their families to learn about all the free services and resources the library offers. The library also offers a safe and supervised space for adolescents to engage in creative, educational activities with caring adults and mentors.

Teen reead week

Teen reead week

Last Name should not be empty!!! Stay ahead. They include plot summaries, questions for deeper discussion, and suggested further readings. No thanks. Teen reead week is also a great opportunity to encourage teens to become regular library users. SLJ Reeqd. Teens can pick out a book to read by chance.

Adult zodiac graphics. An initiative of the American Library Association

Did You Know? They'll be more likely to read the book if they've already established an interest in the Showbiz lingo strip repurposed, and they're more likely to comprehend what they read. Most computers already have it installed. Reading for recreational purposes boosts test scores and lays the foundation for future success as an adult. What is National Library Week? Teens spend the night in the library playing games, reading, watching Teen reead week, and eating snacks. If wsek does not, you can Teen reead week it now. This is a good way to rwead teens to read for pleasure during Teen Read Week. Please enter the code:. Featured Partner. The A-List series is really good too! Struggling readers may also be drawn to stories of other people's real-life struggles, like the graduate student who became a gang leader for a day, or the website where people share their deepest secrets. No Salt Week - epson salt37 weeks pregnant?

It began in and is held annually in October the same week as Columbus Day.

  • Friedman Family Foundation.
  • Learn something new every day More Info
  • Teen Read Week
  • .

Every October libraries across the nation celebrate teens and reading. If you'd rather just get your read on, check out these recommended sci-fi reads. Horror more your speed? T ry these creeptastic titles or browse the rest of our teen book lists.

Skip to main navigation Skip to main navigation Skip to search Skip to search Skip to content. Use current location. See all locations. Admin Admin Admin, collapsed. Main navigation Events. Open search form. Enter search query Clear Text. Saved Searches Advanced Search. Browse Browse, collapsed Browse. By Audience Kids Teens. Teen Read Week , opens a new window opens a new window Every October libraries across the nation celebrate teens and reading.

Happy reading! Footer Menu. I Speak Contact Us Chicago Public Library. Ask a Librarian. Reciprocal Library Verification City of Chicago. Powered by BiblioCommons. BiblioWeb: app05 Version 3.

They're still called the A-List though. If you haven't read it, then I recommend you do, it's pretty awesome! They can listen in the car on the way to school, or follow along with the book to strengthen their reading skills. Teen Read Week This is a good way to encourage teens to read for pleasure during Teen Read Week. Special Days on Wednesday, October

Teen reead week

Teen reead week

Teen reead week

Teen reead week

Teen reead week. Breadcrumb navigation

This can be especially helpful for teens who are auditory learners. Movie read-alikes are great for teens who struggle with comprhension since they will already know the background of the story. They'll be more likely to read the book if they've already established an interest in the movie, and they're more likely to comprehend what they read. Try introducing reluctant readers to novels in verse.

The break from the normal story presentation should intrigue them to keep reading. Graphic novels are also great for reluctant readers. Here are a few websites with lists of recommended graphic novels for teens:. Our author interviews are also a great way to spark an interest in reading! Students can hear from authors like Jack Gantos , recounting the time one struggling reader told him one of his books was the first he ever finished. They will likely also enjoy Jack Gantos' biography , in which he candidly recounts his own struggles with low self-esteem and related issues.

Struggling readers may also be drawn to stories of other people's real-life struggles, like the graduate student who became a gang leader for a day, or the website where people share their deepest secrets.

You'll find these stories, and more, in our recommended non-fiction section. Don't miss AdLit's guided discussions by subject for your book clubs! They include plot summaries, questions for deeper discussion, and suggested further readings. Take on the challenge! Most computers already have it installed.

If yours does not, you can download it now. The statements and views expressed are solely the responsibility of the author s.

All About Adolescent Literacy. Home About Us Contact Us. Another potential activity for Teen Read Week includes providing a lock-in at the library. Teens spend the night in the library playing games, reading, watching movies, and eating snacks. The librarian and other library staff supervise the teens throughout the night and serve them breakfast in the morning. Anime film festivals are other popular events during Teen Read Week.

Many teens enjoy watching Japanese animation called anime. Libraries take advantage of this obsession with anime by hosting film festivals featuring the cartoons. The librarian will also use this opportunity to booktalk the various manga, or Japanese comic books, that the library has available for checkout. If the budget permits, some libraries may choose to invite a popular author to the library.

Authors who write books for teens can make a public appearance at the library, reading selections from their work, answering questions from teens, and speaking about the writing process.

At the conclusion, the library can offer the author's book as a door prize to one of the teens in the audience. This is a good way to encourage teens to read for pleasure during Teen Read Week. Teen crafts and gaming nights are two other options for libraries that want to lure more teens into its doors. Many teens love to create art, knit, draw, or make other types of crafts. Those who love to play video games will come to the library if it provides them with gaming opportunities free of charge.

Graphic novels are an example of a niche that has fans that might not really consider themselves to be readers, but if they have events catering to them at this kind of festival, then they might start to see themselves more that way. The reason that there has been such a big push in the last decade or so of teenager getting into literature all comes from the Harry Potter novels and then the Twilight novels after that and both of those caused a rush of similarly themed books.

I'd say The Hunger Games sparked the dystopian theme and there will be some other big breakout hit after that to inspire the copycats. Anything that will get young people to read literature is good in my book though and there have been some amazing, experimental stories released for teenagers over the years.

I do wonder, though, whether these kinds of festivals really encourage people to read, or if they are just for the ones who already do read. Teenagers are capable of reading "adult" books but it's nice to be able to see yourself in what you're reading, rather than an older character that you can't really relate to.

I do find it interesting that my favorites as a teenager in the 80s were dystopian and apocalyptic themed novels and that seems to be a major theme in YA again today. I don't know if that's because it's always going to be a strong theme for that age group or if it's a cyclic thing.

Post your comments Post Anonymously Please enter the code:. One of our editors will review your suggestion and make changes if warranted. Note that depending on the number of suggestions we receive, this can take anywhere from a few hours to a few days.

Thank you for helping to improve wiseGEEK! View slideshow of images above. Watch the Did-You-Know slideshow. Follow wiseGEEK.

Teenspace - Programs: Teen Read Week

TeenTober is a new, nationwide celebration hosted by libraries every October and aims to celebrate teens, promote year-round teen services and the innovative ways teen services helps teens learn new skills, and fuel their passions in and outside the library. Library staff are encouraged to utilize this new celebration to advocate for and raise awareness of the importance of year-round teen services in libraries. Digital marketing materials will be available for free download soon.

This year, Teen Read Week and Teen Tech Week will be dissolving to form a month long celebration of teen programming and teen services in libraries across the country! The month long celebration will be held in October of every year. Librarians, please encourage your teens to be a part of an exciting initiative. The celebration will include related displays, passive activities, and programming that will fit public libraries, school libraries, and beyond!

We will also being asking both teens and librarians for their feedback on the celebration, so be sure to keep an eye out for that. To submit your celebration name, post on social media with your suggested idea and use yalsaname or fill out our Google form. The winner will receive prizes and recognition! Once the submission date has passed, there will be a voting period for the top 10 entries.

Please share the news! Eventually, the TRW ning site resources will also be relocated to the wiki. Please look out for the announcement in early To learn more, please read the latest re-envisioning TTW and TRW board document, along with board document 32 from last year. If you would like to be kept in the loop about the re-envisioning process, please sign up here.

Finally, we ended with a Conlanging Workshop devoted to creating new languages, using the rules of David J. Throughout, we touched on the theory of linguistic relativity, the idea that the structure of a language actually affects how each speaker thinks and views the world.

Further, as attendees were introduced to the workings of myriad languages, they saw that things that seem obvious to English speakers are not necessarily the case. Over the four programs, attendees learned language and culture are intrinsically tied together, and were able to see its impact on a variety of different worldviews. The possibilities of language are vast, there is no set way to do things. Not only is that an amazing fact, but the realization that most words have stories behind their formation was of great interest to them as well.

Personally, I find language fascinating, and I knew many of our teenage patrons thought the same. But what I found in doing these programs is the widespread appeal of the topic of language. Some patrons, for example, who had only ever attended our Super Smash Bros. Tournaments, eagerly attended the Conlanging Workshop. People who had no real interest wound up attending out of curiosity or to accompany a friend, and left amazed and intrigued. To see them speechless as they learned each mind blowing linguistic fact was wonderful.

Language is something so natural to us, so ubiquitous, that we often pay it no mind. But to see behind the curtains, to see the impact it has on us and we on it, is where I think the appeal lies.

The newfound interest could lead to them investigating further, to possibly delving into related topics of psychology, philosophy, education, language teaching, sociology, anthropology, computer science, and even artificial intelligence. If a library is looking for an educational opportunity for its teenage patrons, language is an excellent starting point. If you are interested in being a part of the discussion and creating a new awareness campaign to elevate the importance of year-round services to teens, please contact me to volunteer crystle.

To learn more, please read the re-envisioning TTW and TRW board document, along with board document 32 from last year. When I read Long Way Down by Jason Reynolds for the first time last year, I was completely overwhelmed—this story was about my students! So many of them have lost family and friends due to gun violence, and many of them have been faced with similar emotional tragedies in their lives. So I wanted them to see that their feelings and experiences are valid by reading a book written by a man who looks like them and understands them and IS them.

But being a Title 1 school means funds are tight, and purchasing class sets of books especially enough for all classes to read at the same time is just not in our budget without help. When I saw that the Teen Read Week Grant was open for applications in May, I immediately texted my reading teacher and asked her what she thought about the potential of doing a school-wide read next year with a Jason Reynolds book.

And then we were selected, and the brainstorming began. But how do you plan a reading program for students who are reluctant readers? You make it relevant! Continue reading.

I spoke with Shutts recently to discuss the Teen Read Week Grant process, and evaluate the outcomes of the grant-funded program. Shutts used Teen Read Week Grant funds to purchase a circulating board game collection focusing on literacy-based games. The White Oak Library plans to market this new collection to English as Second Language classes and other patrons who are learning English.

The Library held a game night launch program during Teen Read Week. Shutts expects word to grow slowly but steadily about the game collection. The Library has promoted this new collection through many avenues, but the hope is that word of mouth will help increase knowledge of this service. By launching the board game collection during Teen Read Week, the hope was that teens and their families would come to the launch night. The Illinois state budget crisis has hit White Oak Library hard, and because of this the programming budgets had been cut deeply.

Shutts used the Teen Programming Guidelines, and focused on aligning programs with community and library priorities. The White Oak Library has recently updated its strategic plan to include increased support for second language learners.

The next step in this plan was creating a collection focusing on literacy games. Do you have trouble getting teens into your interactive programs for your teens during Teen Read Week? Are you still trying to understand your teen demographic? Teens are busy students, especially during their final high school years, but they can certainly still participate in other planned activities on their own time whenever they visit your library.

The one place I knew we were failing our patrons was with families who were learning English as a second language. We always talk about ways to better serve our patrons in this aspect but never really got around to doing anything. Once the plan was released we finally started making an effort. Seeing the families coming in for conversation clubs, I noticed the children and teens were always left behind. The teen services staff quickly realized the teens needed something of their own, as a way to learn and to help their family members learn.

We thought about how language is learned and realized that playing games increases language comprehension skills. Games add an extra component of fun to learning, making it active learning. These games will become a circulating collection that families can borrow. We hope it will help them bond, learn, and play together. It is always hard to find a way to tell our library users about all the services we have for them.

A great number of connections, activities, and displays are piquing our interest as we plan for a week of celebrating cultural diversity and reading for pleasure. Book spine poetry , a bookface showdown , and a where do you read? We want to focus on drawing students to the library using the phone and social media power couple that is so influential to tweens and teens.

Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email. Email Address. Offer 24 hour reading suggestions by creating an accessible jar of book titles that contain short excerpts. Teens can pick out a book to read by chance. Decorate a bulletin board with magnets of famous lines and phrases from books. Place a blank bookmark inside popular titles with a short message that encourages teens to write their own review of the book.

Teens can vote for their favorite title. Have all the supplies for black out poetry and display examples and finished work. Design a new cover for your favorite book on a Post-It note or have teens completely redesign a book cover.

Teen reead week

Teen reead week