Vintage battery collector-Collecting Batteries

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Vintage battery collector

There are patent Vintage battery collector on the middle band of each light. Pictures use your back button to return to this page : Larger Photo. We plan on eventually collectog them on our FlashlightMuseum. Results 1 to 16 of Re: Vintage batteries you might be surprised how many are still good. In Eveready began selling an improved battery called the "Tungsten Battery". Several early electrical companies made the Iron Candle. The small meter in the upper right is to set the AC line voltage. You can still get carbon zinc Vintage battery collector.

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Create your own Vintage Air climate control system with one of our universal Builder Series kits and choose the evaporator, controls, louvers and accessories that best fit your custom build. Kids that grew up in the s had one James Bond car on their minds. Tamiya Wild Willys. But we always recommend charging a battery before installing in the car. Sixteen cars were released that very first year. Today, adults nostalgic for their youth are paying big bucks for some of these toys. The Stunt Cycle sat in Vintage battery collector red launch stand battdry a handle on one end to crank up the gyro wheel on the back of the cycle. Besides the General Lee, Mego produced more of the coolest toys of the battfry, including action figures and playsets from the original Planet of Vintage battery collector Apes movies. But by the s, it needed a re-boot, so Hasbro re-invented the G. Vintage battery collector the movie, the Lotus plunges into the surf and transforms into Bond's personal submarine. Our Policies.

I have acted as an expert witness in 8 flashlight litigation matters.

  • Kids who were into cars, trucks, and motorcycles had plenty of cool toys to choose from in the s and s.
  • Vintage Air is owned and operated by experienced street rodders who have been involved in the sport for over thirty years.
  • But we always recommend charging a battery before installing in the car.

Users browsing this forum: Google [Bot] and 4 guests. Posted: Jun Sat 23, am. Sometimes people will re-stuff them with modern batteries. Kinda like they do with caps.

Although some may collect them. Voltages were just more precise back in the days of them batteries. Now days most people will wire up a number of 9 volt batteries to make close to the voltage required. Voltages weren't any more precise back then than they are now. Batteries are series strings of 1. If you stack 45 cells in series, you get Another common B battery was 45 V; a series string of thirty 1. The old Burgess XX45 was actually a I guess that makes sense now that you mention it..

Which have 6 AAAA batteries inside them.. The cells in those packs were carbon-zinc. Modern batteries are usually zinc-chloride. They produce a smidgen more voltage per cell. You can still get carbon zinc batteries. They are only good for extremely low drain devices,where as alkaline are good for anything..

Never heard of zinc-chloride batteries,only alkaline and carbon zinc.. Although i did do a wikipedia search just to see what zinc-chloride batteries were, and it states they are an improvement on the carbon zinc batteries. When i buy batteries i have always bought alkaline. Posted: Jun Sat 23, pm. As long as the voltage isn't extremely high, it's just as happy with 75v vs 60v, and worked down to battery voltage of 30v or less I have several 20s battery sets that I display with "good" C batteries.

To me "good" means not leaking all over the place - not good as in - well, good. If I had a couple of the 45V B batteries I would display them as well. I've been educated, especially as I had no idea that modern batteries are made of individual cells that you can separate off and use independently.

I'm off to carve open a PP3 now I'll probably donate this battery to anyone who needs it. Posted: Jun Sun 24, am. Best thing would be for you to carefully open the wrapper, scan it, and put it up for download on the web somewhere.

That way folks could make reproductions of it. I've seen wrappers for a lot of battery types available for download on the web, but not an Eveready JPEG compression is optimized for conutinous-tone images, not line art.

No need to scan this one. If this error persists, please contact the website webmaster. Posted: Jun Sun 24, pm. The image is already available on the internet:. Posted: Jun Mon 25, am. I guess, back in the day, they at least told you what the voltage should be. These days, a 9V battery can be 8.

Page 1 of 1. Previous topic Next topic. Always enjoying the sound of a tube radio warming up Rich, W3HWJ. Peter Bertini. Tuberadiogeek wrote: You can still get carbon zinc batteries. Like Gene said, it doesn't make difference for old battery sets I was just pointing out that there is a difference between the old carbon zinc cells and what are being sold today. Someone using an alkaline or zinc-chloride to calibrate a Heath VTVM, as shown in the manual, will be introducing error.

Nodric wrote: I've been educated, especially as I had no idea that modern batteries are made of individual cells that you can separate off and use independently. If it wre a 45V I'd take it for the set above.

But I don't think that they used that type back then. The image is already available on the internet: Why so it is. Thanks Rich.

The Stunt Cycle was so popular it was re-issued in the s and again in the early s. You have three 3 options: 1 You know the correct battery for your car; place your order and we will ship that battery. Even in stock form, these were incredible machines, with functional long-travel suspensions, big power and grippy tires. From to , car-loving kids around the country were treated to the TV show Knight Rider on Friday nights. The Inventors Of Performance Air Conditioning… Vintage Air is owned and operated by experienced street rodders who have been involved in the sport for over thirty years. Motorized Battle Tank.

Vintage battery collector

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Here are a dozen vintage wheeled toys worth crawling through the attic for. Launched in , Stomper 4X4s by Schaper were aimed at young kids swept up in the off-road craze.

They even had headlights that lit up. The bodies of these toys were highly detailed and true to the real machines, which added to the fun. Stompers had a rough life.

Kids played with them outside in the dirt just to see how capable they were. The bodywork got scratches; the clips that held them on the chassis could break. The aforementioned big rig models seem to be some of the most valuable. Unopened models still sealed in cellophane command several hundred dollars. Slot car racing tracks were hugely popular in the s and s. Big ones occupied major real estate inside hobby shops, but it was the smaller size scale slot cars and the tracks they ran on that provided years of fun for car-crazed kids at home.

The small cars have electrical contacts that maintain a connection with the track's rails. The car's speed was modulated by a hand-held controller; squeeze that trigger too much when your AFX car approached a curve and it could fly right off the track, something nearly all of us did for fun at one point. Today, many of the cars themselves cost that much if the bodies are in good condition.

From to , car-loving kids around the country were treated to the TV show Knight Rider on Friday nights. The premise sounds ridiculous today, but that all-new Trans Am was freshly styled for the s—just like its co-star, The Hoff. The show was a huge hit and toys flooded the market. One of the coolest was the Voice Car by Kenner. Push down on the cool vintage blue California license plate and the Voice Car would say six different phrases.

It came with a Michael Knight action figure, too. Knight Rider toys in general seem to be very collectible. Motorcycle stunt riding belonged to Evel Knievel in the s. Knievel was legendary not only for the wild jumps he completed, but the ones that he crashed on, too.

When Ideal released a series of Evel Knievel toys from ''77, they were red-hot sellers, and the most popular and most valuable of these is the Stunt Cycle. The Stunt Cycle sat in a red launch stand with a handle on one end to crank up the gyro wheel on the back of the cycle. Once fully charged up, the cycle would launch and zoom across your living room or over a jump.

It was awesome. Eventually the compnay produced a Dragster, a Chopper, and the Sky Cycle, all of which worked on that gyro platform.

The Stunt Cycle was so popular it was re-issued in the s and again in the early s. But it's the original s merch that brings the money. Sealed in the box and never opened? Way more. So start digging around your parent's attic. Barbie's got to have her dream car. Mattel made a series of Barbie-themed Corvettes as well as a dune buggy and a hip little Beach Bus van back in the day.

But the Star Traveler, launched in , was the best of them all. Here was a faithful three-foot long scale replica of GMC's innovative front-wheel drive, V8-powered motorhome. The Star Traveler was produced through the s and featured many of the amenities of the real motorhome, including a shower, couch, beds, kitchen, and even a detachable sun deck and even a little hibachi grill.

Barbie toys are highly collectible, and this motorhome is no exception. So the next time one appears at a local yard sale for ten bucks, snag it. You know. Hot Wheels are some of the most popular and valuable toy cars of all time. The brand launched in as a more fun and custom take on the traditional small toy car.

Sixteen cars were released that very first year. Since that time there have been thousands more launched in practically every design imaginable. Hot Wheels and those iconic playsets remain popular today with more than four billion of them produced. Hot Wheels collectors are a devoted bunch. So it's not hard to find the ones you played with as a kid for sale today on Ebay.

Most are still cheap because the company built so many of them. But the funky and unique ones can command staggering prices. Because there are so many Hot Wheels out there, it depends on condition and rarity. Generally, the early cars with redline tires are some of the most valuable; the most desirable ones can command thousands of dollars.

There are quite a few 70s models with some value. Similarly, a rare version of the Porsche in "Gold Chrome" paint from , or could bring its owner a cool grand. So dig around your collection—there might be a hidden treasure.

The Dukes of Hazzard was one of the first TV shows to launch a full-scale toy marketing blitz. Toy companies produced a staggering number of branded products in the s. From watches to sneakers to big wheel cycles and "walkie talkies," practically everything a kid could wear, ride or play with had a Dukes version.

The items that seem to get the big bucks today are from Mego. Mego made not only the action figures but also a full range of cars from the show.

And it was sweet, featuring a roof hatch for Bo and Luke Duke to jump inside for their next adventure. Because as everyone knows, the General Lee's doors were welded shut. If no status is listed for your battery then the default is the first. Now Available - These batteries are available to be built.

Because of high demand, these batteries are taking at least weeks after orders are placed to get these classic car batteries built and shipped. Not Available - These AGM batteries are either discontinued or will not be in production for the near future.

If production starts again then they move to the Available Now status. Older orders will be built first so get your classic car battery orders in now. You can place your orders by paying online, or by calling us to place your order over the phone.

By calling us you won't be charged until your battery is close to being shipped. By ordering online you will be charged at the time of purchase. These classic car batteries are only available as sealed maintenance free batteries.

Please Read - We are continually working on updating our website to make sure you get the correct battery for your classic car. Some details may vary from the pictures and the actual battery.

You have three 3 options: 1 You know the correct battery for your car; place your order and we will ship that battery. Then on the shopping cart their is a section for order comments. That is where you can put the following information and we will double check to make sure you did order the correct battery. If we have any questions we will e-mail you for more information.

We will ship these Free of charge by UPS ground to any of the 48 contiguous states. Add the Extended Area shipping fee here to your antique battery order if shipping to those areas.

Contact Us. National Brands. Battery Types.

Antique Radio Forums • View topic - B+ Batteries - Any collectors?

I have acted as an expert witness in 8 flashlight litigation matters. As an attorney and flashlight historian, I have been instrumental in defending and prosecuting cases involving flashlight patents and claims. I am available as an expert witness through my law office number. As some of you know, I was a guest on the Martha Stewart Living show. I brought a nice group of flashlights to show Martha and my Flashlight Museum got over visits to my site from people who saw the show and wanted to see more.

C ondition counts! If your flashlight was made after and is in rusty or damaged condition, it is probably, not very collectible. The Flashlight Museum shows a portion of my collection and currently covers, Early flashlights, Sterling Silver lights, Art Deco Purse lights, Tin Lithographed lights, Flippo Keychain lights showing cartoon charactors and personalities, and a selection of miscellaneous neat flashlights that I thought that you would enjoy.

Don't miss the section on "recent acquisitions". Parts of the following text are excerpted from my book, Collecting Flashlights , copyright by Stuart Schneider, No part of this information may be used for any reason, except with the written permission of Stuart Schneider.

Box 64, Teaneck, NJ Portable electric lights are a relatively recent invention, but actually older than most people think. Searching in a dark closet before , one had to use a candle or kerosene lantern. Accidents occurred and fires followed. A safer alternative was needed. The first trustworthy lighting device was the flashlight, invented about Portable electric lights were called "flash lights" since they would not give a long steady stream of light.

The carbon filament bulbs were inefficient and the batteries were weak, allowing the user to flash the light on for only a few seconds, then release the contact. When batteries and bulbs became more efficient, the switch was improved. As flashlight became popular, flashlight makers began to add decorative elements to the lights. Above is the Reliable flashlight with a sliding bridge switch. I would like to buy Reliable, Matchless, and other early pre interesting switch flashlights.

Since the flashlight could not exist without a battery and a bulb, the history of the flashlight is associated with batteries and bulbs. The first battery appeared in , invented by French inventor, George Leclanche. He called it a "single fluid electric generating battery". It was a wet cell, made by filling a glass jar with ammonium chloride, manganese dioxide and zinc and then adding a carbon bar for the positive end of the cell.

It was not portable. If tipped over, the acid would spill out. Thomas Edison invented the incandescent bulb in Improvement to the battery came in , when a German scientist, Dr.

Carl Gassner, encased the wet cell chemicals in a sealed zinc container. This was the first dry cell and the first portable battery. The O. Patented November 15, It is 8 inches tall and took 2 "D" cells which were contained in the upright tube.

This early brass flashlight was turned on by screwing down the pointy thing on the top to use the technical term. The design and lines of this beauty would fit right in to a s Flash Gordon adventure. I am turning on the Protecto-Ray". The leading name in flashlights was Eveready. Hubert did not invent the first flashlight. David Misell qualifies as the inventor of the tubular flashlight and the early bicycle light. He came to the United States in and changed his name to Conrad Hubert.

A few years later he opened a novelty shop in New York City and probably sold some of the battery powered items made by Birdsall Electric Mfg. David Misell worked for Birdsall and bought their assets when that company failed. He was an inventor and not a businessman, so in , he went to work for Conrad Hubert. In , a 6 battery was needed to produce useful light. The 6 battery was six inches high and weighed over three pounds. In , the "D" cell battery was invented and several together could produce the power of the 6 battery in a much smaller size.

They provided enough power to make hand held portable light a possibility. One of the early electrical novelties powered by a battery was a simple stick pin with a miniature bulb. Wires connected the bulb to a battery hidden in a pocket or behind a scarf tie. When the wearer pressed a switch carried in the pocket, the bulb flashed.

The scarf pin was a novelty when introduced, but users discovered practical uses for it, such as reading in dark restaurants or theaters. Circa porcelain stick pin with a clown's head see the stick pin collection on the Recent Acquisitions page. The wire leads to battery case that held a 2 "AA" battery pack.

On the right is a wooden Eveready House Light made about The front face has a rounded edge. The earlier model of this light is distinguishable from this one by a 45 degree flat bevel on the front edge and the earliest version has a funnel shaped reflector. About , David Misell patented several flashlights. One was a 3 "D" cell bicycle light with a wooden battery case.

Misell filed the application for the bicycle light patent on October 9, American Electrical Novelty and Manufacturing Co. Misell and Hubert assembled a number of tubular flashlights and gave them to New York City policemen in different precincts. As shown in their first catalog, by March, , Hubert began receiving favorable testimonials from the policemen. Testimonials are statements from people extolling the virtues of a certain product. These testimonials were used in the company's literature to promote sales.

Hubert was a great salesman and the publicity obtained by the testimonials made the public want to own a flashlight.

On January 21, , Conrad Hubert filed a patent application for a clover-leaf bicycle light shown near the top of this page. The patent was granted on October 24, In Conrad Hubert produced his first catalog. The cover of his second catalog of , showed the world being illuminated with Hubert's flashlight, with the words "Let There Be Light". The brand name of the products was "Ever Ready". During the first few years of the company, the name "Ever Ready" did not appear on their lights.

By about the name was stamped on the endplate of the light. The screw thread model lower photo is the second version of the Model One, ca. The top photo shows two first Model One lights. They have a bayonet locking bottom cap and a friction fit top cap.

None are marked "Ever Ready". There are patent dates on the middle band of each light. When you think of what a flashlight is, you rarely think of table lights. These three are Ever Ready candle lights with a battery in the base. Candle" and a rare Reliable Iron Candle. Several early electrical companies made the Iron Candle. Telling them apart is difficult, but there are slight differences, such as switch placement and shape or color of the wooden base that give a clue as to the maker.

Conrad Hubert remained president and there was little change in the general policies of the company. The name was changed to "The American Ever Ready Company" and the trade name was shortened to one word, the familiar "Eveready".

This made bulbs more efficient and brighter than before. Batteries had also improved and new switches began to appear on flashlights that allowed them to stay on for a few minutes.

One of these was the "Glove Catch" switch begun in and phased out by Note no switch, just a button to flash the light. I named the switch on top "the ramp to the button" style ca. Note that the battery pack of 2 "B" cells and a shortened "B" cell was made with a well in it to hold the bulb assembly. That idea was short lived. In Eveready began selling an improved battery called the "Tungsten Battery".

The battery contained no tungsten, but was so named to ride on the coattails of the popular tungsten filament bulbs. In Eveready replaced the push button and glove catch switches with a low profile simple slide switch so regardless of the date on the bottom plate of the light, any flashlight with a slide switch was made in or after In Eveready replaced the low profile switch with a high profile simple slide switch.

The new higher profile slide switch was used on both vest pocket and tubular flashlights in

Vintage battery collector

Vintage battery collector

Vintage battery collector