Vintage kawasaki race bike-Classic Japanese Motorcycles Kawasaki

By submitting your data, you agree with the Kawasaki's privacy policy and confirm you have read and accepted it. Throughout the extensive history of Kawasaki there has been a wealth of iconic motorcycles:. We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you do not accept, itis possible that some parts of this website will not function correctly. However, if you would like to, you can change your cookie settings at any time.

Vintage kawasaki race bike

Ninja H2 SX. Utilising shaft drive and air assisted twin rear shock absorbers, the Z started life with three twin-choke carburettors eventually evolving into a bhp fuel injected machine. The demonic howl of a three cylinder cc two stroke Kawasaki racer once heard is never forgotten. This restored Kawasaki KZ has just under 36, miles and looks to be in prime shape Vintage kawasaki race bike many more. Throughout the extensive history of Kawasaki there has been a wealth of Richmond sluts motorcycles:. Got Vintage kawasaki race bike urge for something different? Harnessing a new engineering and styling approach dubbed "Sugomi", the Z pushes the boundaries Second favorit peep candy color Supernaked styling and engine Vibtage to new heights. So, another week, and another Kawasaki, but this time one that's just as happy carving canyons as it is carrying groceries on its handy luggage rack -- a Kawasaki GPz

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Pics are shitty low res. Today that's exactly what we've found: a Kawasaki Z1 Largest cock in porn ready for a new home and needs next to nothing. Some really cool seats too. Kawasaki S3 Gallery. Though this blog often includes a variety of bikes in a variety of conditions, we love to see an original bike for sale that someone has really taken care of. Last week we featured a Kawasaki H2a fun if slightly impractical bike we've always loved. The sound and the fury: celebrate the machines that changed the Vintage kawasaki race bike Kawasaki F7 Gallery. Forgot Password. Kawasaki KH Gallery. We want one anyway. A reader found and restored a Kawasaki Bushmaster much like his first bike and rode it through Death Valley. Kawasaki GPZ Gallery.

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By submitting your data, you agree with the Kawasaki's privacy policy and confirm you have read and accepted it. Throughout the extensive history of Kawasaki there has been a wealth of iconic motorcycles:. We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you do not accept, itis possible that some parts of this website will not function correctly. However, if you would like to, you can change your cookie settings at any time.

For more information see our "cookies and privacy conditions". Newsletter Add your email to subscribe All required fields. Iconic Models Throughout the extensive history of Kawasaki there has been a wealth of iconic motorcycles:. The line of B8 motorcycles was the first to carry the full Kawasaki name. The cc two stroke engine produced 8 horsepower at 8,rpm and was designed based on technical knowledge garnered from the development and production of aircraft engines.

In fact, the tank badges read "Kawasaki Aircraft". Known as the "Red Tank" the B8M was created specifically for the motocross championships in Japan. In , it proved itself a strong performer, sweeping the podium by finishing in 1st through 6th place. The B8M was the first racing motorcycle to be built by Kawasaki and it was the first model to be sold as a production racing machine. The success of the B8M began a legacy for Kawasaki racing performance. At the time of its launch in , the parallel twin cc air-cooled W1 was the largest capacity motorcycle produced in Japan.

Its reputation for durability and performance made it very popular both in Japan and in export markets like the USA where Kawasaki were keen to establish a presence. The W1 continued in production for some considerable time and was even produced in later life as a police specification machine complete with front twin disc brakes.

Starting on the drawing board and tested by KHI at Kyoto university as first a large air-cooled twin, a V-3 configuration or parallel triple, the H1 as we know it was eventually created as a high performance three cylinder, piston ported two-stroke. Early testing dictated the innovative use of electronic ignition to deter low speed plug fouling and the design goal of bhp per litre was achieved.

Dave Simmonds H1R Developed and modified by the factory and Simmonds himself, later versions of the H1R were also raced by the likes of Kork Ballington in his native South Africa, and Mick Grant, who raced a water-cooled version to victory in the Senior race at the Isle of Man TT.

Big brother to the H1, the cc three cylinder air-cooled, two-stroke first hit the streets in as the Mach IV. With more torque than the it was, for many, easier to ride - even though the power delivery of early models was still fierce with H2R style cylinder porting. Spawning the H2R racing machine made famous by the likes of Mick Grant, Paul Smart and Yvonne Du Hammel, the street H2 added to Kawasakis reputation for cutting edge style and ground breaking performance.

With its disc front brake, electronic ignition and steering damper as standard, the H2 was said to capable of passing anything… except a petrol station. One of the true icons of motorcycling, the Z1 was initially designed as a cc machine then enlarged to cc when a competitor launched a cc four cylinder. Evolving into to the Z in , the cc Z1 engine finally made way for the Z1 based cc ZA1 in H2R and KR The demonic howl of a three cylinder cc two stroke Kawasaki racer once heard is never forgotten.

Piston ported, and working best in across a narrow power band, the air-cooled H2R and later water-cooled KR engines did their best to tie the tubular steel chassis of these iconic lime green race bikes into knots. When they went they really went. Conceived in an attempt to create a powerful Grand Prix machine with a narrow frontal area, Kawasaki created the KR series of both and cc machines with the water-cooled cylinders one behind each other, rather than side by side.

KT Trials. Trials also became highly popular. Kawasaki sought to acquire a place in the market which had previously been dominated by first British and then Spanish made machines.

Working in partnership with world famous trials ace, Don Smith, Kawasaki created the KT machine complete with its twin spark plug cylinder head and quick release rear wheel and hub. An accomplished machine in the hands of Smith and many others, the KT also featured a drip feed drive chain oiler with a reservoir in the swinging arm and a lighting kit for road registration p. World Endurance Machine. Swiss rider Alain Genoud, and his French riding partner, Georges Godier, were rebuffed by one Japanese manufacturer before striking a deal with Kawasaki to contest in the World Endurance Championship.

Based on road bike engines, the rules allowed special frames and suspension in the most competitive class and the Z1 engine proved an ideal Endurance tool. Easy to tune and get high horsepower from, the engine also proved hugely reliable and practically unburstable. And the rewards for their dedication to Kawasaki? The world endurance title and a raft of wins under their own steam and with an impressive cast of world famous endurance riders in the years. Possessing the agility of a cc machine with the performance of a cc, the Z became deservedly popular with the biking public.

Launch of the cc Z1-R. Utilising shaft drive and air assisted twin rear shock absorbers, the Z started life with three twin-choke carburettors eventually evolving into a bhp fuel injected machine.

With an engine using technology from the all conquering KR tandem twin racer, the KR was far more than a four cylinder version of the same machine. Sporting a sheet aluminium monocoque chassis, the KR derived much of its look from Kawasaki aircraft wind-tunnel experience. Top Fuel Bike. The measure that everyone else had to beat, the Z1 based bike was one of the first to run a reversed cylinder head with forced induction up front and exhausts exiting from the rear.

His achievement of a 7. Created at a time when carburettors were still dominant, the fuel injected Kawasaki ZH was a first for Kawasaki and among the earliest Fi equipped street motorcycles. Mixing a dash of style with sophistication, the distinctive gold wheels were matched by an imposing black and gold paint scheme marking out the H as something special among its peers. Still utilising the ubiquitous cc air-cooled Kawasaki engine, the ZH laid the foundations for all future fuel injected Kawasaki motorcycles.

Lawson Superbike ZSR. Granddaddy of the justifiably famous GPz range was the GPzB1, the original twin shock red missile. The essential maxim of there being no substitute for cubes was never better manifested than with the big air-cooled GPz. The AR50 exuded style and featured such desirable standard features as cast alloy wheels, front disc brake, a bikini fairing and Uni-Trak rear suspension.

Adding a dash of performance — and at the same time, an alternative to the road styled AR range - the AE80 catered for the fashion for off-road style machine among those taking their first tentative steps in the world of two wheels. A capable green lane machine, the AE80 was, for many, their first machine and, as importantly, their first Kawasaki.

GPz Turbo. Forerunner to the Ninja ZX-6R, the GPzR singlehandedly created the middleweight Supersports class, and in so doing, proved that large capacity engines were not necessary for high performance. With its trademark perimeter frame joining the headstock to the swinging arm pivot point in the straightest possible line, the GPzR handled as good as it looked and surprised many with its astonishing turn of speed.

Still as potent a weapon today as when it was launched way back in , the ZZR set performance and durability standards that its forbears like the Z1 would be proud of. At one time, the world fastest motorcycle, speed was not the entire story of the mighty ZZR.

Comfort, handling and the ability to cross continents with ease made the ZZR a machine against which all others in its class were measured. Born out of the KX, the mighty KX was — and is — a fearsome beast. Initially an air-cooled twin shock machine, the KX was eventually water-cooled and came with Uni-trak rear suspension.

What never changed was the need to have mighty respect for a machine that could kick, punch and bully any rider into submission. A big, lazy V-Twin is the archetypal Cruiser engine format, but for a long time the entry level Cruiser class was neglected by motorcycle manufacturers.

The VN from Kawasaki righted that wrong had all the looks and style of a far bigger machine, but in far more manoeuvrable and light-weight package. Perhaps not among the very fastest machines in its class, the legendary cc ZX-7R more than made up for this with stunning handling and highly responsive suspension. Raced to countless wins in its racing ZX-7RR form, the water-cooled cc machine quickly gained praise for its on-road abilities and handling poise — especially in wet or low adhesion conditions.

Evocing Kawasaki's famous W1 of the 's, the W four-stroke twin looked and felt genuinely authentic. An instant classic with features such as a bevel driven camshaft and it sold in great numbers to mature fans re-living their motorcycling youth plus younger fans discovering this highly rewarding type of machine for the very first time.

Ninja ZXR. Appealing to riders with an equal love of retro style and modern engineering, the ZRX generated a fiercely loyal fan base. A cc powerplant offered stunning performance while its chassis was thought by many to be simply outstanding. With a reputation for performance stretching back to the cc H1 of , Kawasaki Supersports machines exemplify a hard edged, no compromise attitude loved by experienced motorcyclists around the world.

Even so, the arrival of the ZXR in still surprised many. With horsepower on tap, and the steering geometry and suspension dynamics of a full on superbike racer, the ZXR was designed for supremacy at the hands of racers and the most committed road riders. Quickly establishing a reputation as the most extreme litre class Supersports machine of its time, the ZXR has acquired rightful status as a machine that exhibits absolutely no compromise.

Four stroke, then two stroke and finally four again. The world of motocross — or scrambling as it was called way back when - was initially dominated by four stroke machines, and the majority of those British. With the advent of the expansion chamber exhausts, two stroke machines made considerably more power and were much lighter, so the world abandoned four strokes.

Recently though, MX has gone full circle and for noise and emissions reasons, four stroke is King once more. A sales success from introduction, the Z soon became the basis for many riders to create their own personalised machines giving birth to a vast "Supernaked Subculture". Top selling machine in many European countries, the Z featured on many social network picture sites and owner forums, truly a mid capcity icon for a new age of motorcycling.

The largest capacity mass-produced Cruiser ever at launch, the VN was more than mere numbers. With its distinctive "Gattling" style multi-bulb headlamp plus many complimentary engineering ideas, the two litre VN re-established Kawasaki as a cutting edge player in the Cruiser market.

Compact and with an easy to handle nature, the ER-6n caused a sensation at its launch and has continued to impress ever since. The ZXR derived cc water-cooled, parallel-twin engine is housed in a simple yet effective tubular chassis and, along with its launch "signature" colours such as bright yellow, the ER-6n and its siblings, the ER-6f and Versys have won an equally loyal following with commuters and those new to two wheels alike. One of many examples of Kawasaki creating a new market segment, the GTR has practical genuine touring touches and Supersport performance and technology.

With monocoque style chassis and variable valve timimg it is an engineering tour de force. Taking the famous Ninja brand to a new audience, the Ninja R broadened Kawasaki appeal further still to groups such as new riders and women. Using a highly durable engine and chassis package plus highly accepted Ninja looks, the R paved the way for the even more focussed Ninja Style and substance, the Z draws on influences of the past and brings them bang up to date.

Praised not only for its avant garde styling, the Z comes equipped with an advanced aluminium chassis, top class brakes and a horsepower engine.

And, believe it or not, that's what made it great. The first model built by Kawasaki. With the 5-speed transmission this bike has no trouble getting up to speed quickly. Wayyyy in front or all the way in the back. Germain revives a Kawasaki Z1-R, his third, which was literally found in a barn. Random Blast From Past. Kawasaki AR80 Gallery.

Vintage kawasaki race bike

Vintage kawasaki race bike. New Products For October

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Kawasaki's Iconic Motorcycles Models

Trace St. Germain revives a Kawasaki Z1-R, his third, which was literally found in a barn. A reader shares the Kawasaki Z-1 he bought while on leave from the Army and regrets letting go. A reader shares his latest project, a Kawasaki mailbox and memories of a Z-1 from his younger days in the Army. Two words every motorcyclist loves to hear. Anders Carlson restores a Kawasaki H1 with little back story and takes it racing. This humble little 49cc Kawasaki Pet is one of the earliest all-Kawasaki motorcycles in the U.

The Kawasaki Z2 was the little-known Japanese-market cc version of the mighty Z1. The Kawasaki H1 was noisy, blew blue smoke and attracted troublemakers — who wouldn't want one? The Kawasaki H2 Mach IV was to other motorcycles what heavy metal was to rock and roll — outrageous. A reader found and restored a Kawasaki Bushmaster much like his first bike and rode it through Death Valley.

Reader Gary Vailes shows off his two rides, including a Kawasaki Z1. The first motorcycle to wear Kawasaki badges, the cc 2-stroke Kawasaki B8 was launched in Before offroad bikes arrived, scramblers like this Kawasaki Avenger were the best game in town. Before the s turbo wars came the Kawasaki Z1R-TC, the first production turbocharged motorcycle of them all. The Kawasaki GPz An old school canyon carver for the boy racer set. Scott Horr's Mercedes-silver Kawasaki Concours has been quite a conversation starter.

Weighing in at an astounding pounds, the Kawasaki KZ was a heavyweight 6-cylinder motorcycle. This restored Kawasaki KZ has just under 36, miles and looks to be in prime shape for many more. Rarely seen and even more rare to find for sale, this Kawasaki W2 would make an interesting and unusual project perfect for a winter restoration.

British engine fabricator Allen Millyard built a custom 5-cylinder Kawasaki motorcycle for Clive Adams. Winter is coming quickly, which means less riding, but more time for wrenching. Do you have a winter project lined up? If not, we've got a bike for you. With just a little over 24, original miles, it's had the care a good bike deserves, and it's ready for a new owner.

Though this blog often includes a variety of bikes in a variety of conditions, we love to see an original bike for sale that someone has really taken care of. Today that's exactly what we've found: a Kawasaki Z1 that's ready for a new home and needs next to nothing. Ready for riding, here's a bike to make you yearn for spring: a slick Kawasaki GPz, complete with period aftermarket fairing panels and in lovely condition.

The Kawasaki Z1-R carried on the Superbike standard set by the earlier Z1: blazing performance, skittish handling. The Sixties were in full swing, and dizzying changes in art, music and politics were taking place.

Motorcycles were changing, as well. Kawasaki has made a wide variety of motorcycles over the years. Last week we featured a Kawasaki H2 , a fun if slightly impractical bike we've always loved. So, another week, and another Kawasaki, but this time one that's just as happy carving canyons as it is carrying groceries on its handy luggage rack -- a Kawasaki GPz Sometimes it's good to be practical, logical even.

A nice standard style motorcycle, or even a good dual-sport bike, can serve many purposes from commuting to riding curvy roads on a Sunday morning to light touring. A nice two-stroke, cc Kawasaki H2, however, isn't really great for any of these purposes. We want one anyway. Got the urge for something different? We've always been big fans of Kawasaki's two-stroke triples, and the smaller cc S3 is one of the more unusual of the bunch.

Shopping for a new motorcycle in the early s, you also had to choose between normally aspirated or turbo models. This week's eBay searching had its highlights, and one of the coolest bikes we came across was this sweet Kawasaki Z1R. Call it the semi-chopper, or maybe the almost-custom. And, believe it or not, that's what made it great. The Kawasaki GPz set the standard for middleweight sport bikes of the early Eighties.

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Vintage kawasaki race bike

Vintage kawasaki race bike

Vintage kawasaki race bike