Against the ropes review-Against the Ropes () - IMDb

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Against the ropes review

Against the ropes review

Kallen and her movie alter ego come from Detroit. A couple fall in love despite the girl's pessimistic outlook. More From Against the Ropes. Parents Guide. It works near the end of "Against the Ropes," a biopic about Jackie Kallen, who was and is the first female fight promoter in the all-male world of professional boxing. He winds up losing bowel control in the ring it's not shown, but it is heard. Full Cast and Crew. And when forced to choose between a media-op with Ropfs or the small-potatoes Against the ropes review who helped launch her career, she selfishly takes the big dog. Many of the Nude picture of rachel mcadams in this stretch are routine, although the performance by Charles Dutton as a veteran trainer has a persuasive authenticity; he also directs.

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External Reviews. Comedy Fantasy Romance. Against the ropes review William H. Comedy Drama Romance. Edit page. In Theaters. The seemingly perfect relationship between a man and his wife is tested as a result of her alcoholism. Dutton shamelessly allows his own small part as Jackie's mentor to hog the camera. Ryan works hard at Jackie Kallen, but this is not a role she was born to play. She grew up in boxing; her dad ran a gym and when she was a Sport diaper bag girl he sometimes had to chase her out of the ring. Added to Watchlist. The two of Against the ropes review have hardly any dialogue with each other, and although Renee is cheering during the big fight, there's no scene resolving her feelings for her man; the spotlight is on Kallen, which is all right, but it leaves a loose end.

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  • You know the Slow Clap Scene, where the key character walks into the room and it falls silent?

She's "Against the Ropes. Meg Ryan follows up her genre-bending performance in "In the Cut" with another step outside the romantic comedy realm, portraying the real life female boxing manager like her own "Erin Brockovich. Supported by local sports reporter Gaven Ross Timothy Daly, TV's "Wings" , she does, but she really surprises everybody by convincing her loser's drug dealer, Luther Shaw Omar Epps, "Big Trouble" , to let her manage a boxing career for him.

When Larocca blocks her professional chances in Cleveland, Kallen takes Shaw to Buffalo and soon he's too big to ignore, but Kallen lets the media attention, which is focused on her, blind her to her boxer's needs and contributions. Ever the fighter, Kallen does some soul searching and finds herself a champion once again. Ryan, fitted out with heavy eyeliner, Brokovich-provocative wardrobe and bangs in her eyes, gives an interesting performance, but one that constantly demands analysis rather than allowing the audience to give itself over to it.

Ryan puts on a kittenish street voice not having heard Kallen, I cannot profess as to its accuracy and shows the right amount of conflict, a hesitant confidence, if you will, but she never succeeds in truly sinking into the skin of the character.

She does get moments right, particularly when using her sexuality and superior attitude at press conferences. Her performance suffers from the same slightly off feel that pervades the film. Epps, introduced as a pummeling street thug, maintains a swaggering boxer's stance throughout the film, convincing as potential raw talent. Director Charles S. Dutton adds genial support as Felix, a retired coach dragged back into sports by Jackie's fondness and admiration.

It's entertaining to see Shalhoub take and deliver on an uncharacteristic bad guy role and Cortese also serves up able support with his blustering misogyny. Daly's solid as a likable Cleveland sportscaster serving as Jackie's moral compass.

As adapted by Cheryl Edwards "Save the Last Dance" with Jackie Kallen, facts are massaged to pump up the drama the real Kallen began as an entertainment journalist. Dutton paces the film well, but he milks more tension in his press conference scenes than he does in the ring and the film's transitions don't always flow well, a disservice to the performances.

Ruth E. Carter "Daddy Day Care" gives Ryan an 80's bondage style with leather and clothes featuring cutouts and lacing. Robin Clifford. Laura Clifford.

DPReview Digital Photography. Devon Green Gene Mack See All. Quotes Jackie Kallen : All that plastic. Ryan works hard at Jackie Kallen, but this is not a role she was born to play.

Against the ropes review

Against the ropes review

Against the ropes review

Against the ropes review

Against the ropes review

Against the ropes review.

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Against The Ropes

You know the Slow Clap Scene, where the key character walks into the room and it falls silent? And everybody is alert and tense and waiting to see what will happen? And then one person slowly starts to clap, and then two, three, four, and then suddenly the tension breaks and everyone is clapping, even the sourpuss hold-outs?

Can we agree that this scene is an ancient cliche? We can. And yet occasionally I am amazed when it works all the same. It works near the end of "Against the Ropes," a biopic about Jackie Kallen, who was and is the first female fight promoter in the all-male world of professional boxing. It works, and another cliche works, too: the Big Fight scene, right out of " Rocky " and every other boxing movie, in which the hero gets pounded silly but then somehow, after becoming inspired between rounds, comes back and is filled with skill and fury.

Its setup story is flat and lacks authenticity, Meg Ryan is barely adequate as Jackie Kallen, and Omar Epps , as her boxer Luther Shaw, is convincing but underwritten. The film plays like a quick, shallow made-for-TV biopic, but then it relies on those ancient conventions, and they pull it through.

When we meet Kallen, she is the assistant to Cleveland's top boxing promoter. She grew up in boxing; her dad ran a gym and when she was a little girl he sometimes had to chase her out of the ring.

Now she knows as much about boxing as anyone, but of course a woman isn't allowed to use that knowledge. Then, observing a fight in a ghetto drug apartment, she sees a non-drug-related guy waltz in and cream everyone, and she intuits that he could be a great fighter.

This is Luther Shaw, played by Epps as a man with psychic wounds from childhood that sometimes unleash a terrible fury. Kallen persuades him he can be a fighter, signs him, hires a trainer to prepare him, edges around the Cleveland boycott against her by convincing a Buffalo promoter it's time for him to return the favors he got from her dad.

Many of the scenes in this stretch are routine, although the performance by Charles Dutton as a veteran trainer has a persuasive authenticity; he also directs. Ryan works hard at Jackie Kallen, but this is not a role she was born to play.

Ryan is a gifted actress, best at comedy but with lots of noir in her; she's good in thrillers, too. But she's not naturally a brassy exhibitionist, and that's what this role calls for. Kallen, who seems to buy her wardrobe from Trashy Lingerie and Victoria's Secret, and who talks like a girl who grew up in a gym, might have better been cast with someone with rougher notes -- Gina Gershon.

Ryan seems to be pushing it. I say "I think" because the role is so seriously underwritten that the movie would have been better off just not including it. Although Luther and Kallen are never romantically attracted, theirs is the movie's central relationship. Dutton working from a screenplay by Cheryl Edwards , doesn't seem much interested in Luther's private emotional life, and so we get inexplicable scenes in which Luther and Renee seem to be best friends, or are hanging out together, or -- what?

The two of them have hardly any dialogue with each other, and although Renee is cheering during the big fight, there's no scene resolving her feelings for her man; the spotlight is on Kallen, which is all right, but it leaves a loose end. Epps is always convincing, however, and by the last act of the movie we make our accommodation with Ryan because the character has grown more interesting.

Intoxicated by the spotlight of publicity, she starts to think it's about her, not her boxer, and eventually she turns into a media caricature and finds herself forced outside the world she helped to create. This message came to me from a reader named Peter Svensland. He and a fr Who do you read? Good Roger, or Bad Roger? Roger Ebert This message came to me from a reader named Peter Svensland.

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Against the ropes review

Against the ropes review

Against the ropes review